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I just picked up a 2019 with the new Firefly engine but cannot find a whole lot of info anywhere aside from some first-owner Fiat info, which as of June 2019 wasn't much. I've read the Fiat Brazil info site, Wikipedia page on the Fiat/FCA Global Small Engine (GSE) which is the new engine family designed to eventually replace the MultiAir, and the Firefly is the first USDM example from that family. We got the best version so far, the MultiAir III, which is 16-valve, 10.5:1, DI, turbo, air-to-water intercooled aluminum engine. It also has an electonic wastegate and diverter valve, active grill shutters, and revised rev-matching transmission. We really like how it drives so far, powerful and smooth and the trans feels good compared to what I've read about the 9-speeds, but we still have less than 100 miles on the car. I want to baby it through at least the first couple thousand miles, especially with it being all-aluminum, and would like to give it an oil change after maybe 1-2k.

With all that said it is to be determined which parts (if any) cross over between the 1.4 and 1.3, what kind of support it develops, and if they are reliable. We took the plunge with the new engine since the platform has otherwise been developed and refined through the last 4 years of production, we're hoping the engine is solid and lasts. This thread is a place to get a discussion going on this new Firefly engine, 177hp/210ft-lbs is very nice but only if its happy and running! I only know a few things about it, like it runs 39.7psi max boost (lolwut?!) and that oil filters can be tough to find, but otherwise not much.

Please feel free to add in any info or links, there are plenty of infodump pages about the engine but just about no forum feedback.

Here is a good pic with the rear-mounted AWIC:
 

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We've had ours 2 1/2 weeks, have put about 1400 miles on the car, and have driven it offroad for about 150 miles of that. Gravel/dirt including rough gravel roads in the foothills and mountains North of us, as well as some more serious rough roads with winter damage, plus even more rough roads with large erosion ditches, mud, steep hills, rocks, etc. So far the little 1.3 doesn't seem to incur a penalty. It runs as well at 8000 ft as it does on the valley floor. It produces power lower down so it likes to be between 2000 and 3000 RPM for the most part. TQ comes on very early, so it doesn't rev up as much and sound busy. Seems to power through everything so far, but we figured out not to leave it in "auto" mode and 4WD lock, as it will pull power when too many wheels slip (mud, loose, sandy dirt). Put it in sand or mud mode and it will allow some wheels to slip while others put power down.

Our fuel mileage since we picked it up has averaged right at 26MPG. That's including 80MPH freeway commutes in hilly terrain, city driving for part of the commute, country driving on level and hilly terrain at 65-70MPH, plus our 150 miles of offroad/gravel mountain roads. It will pull a better MPG number on a trip, we initially hit 30 for the 2 hour trip home from the dealer. It's a very quiet motor in my opinion, so much so that you don't hear it much below 3000 RPM. Plenty of passing power, seems to be a really good match for the Trailhawk.

Our car is the 2019 Trailhawk with the 22 city/27 highway EPA figures. We've never seen the lower end of that. I'm expecting to lose a little with a more aggressive tire (switching to Falken AT3W's in the 215/65R17 size).

Going to order a couple oil filters through our parts dept. to have on hand here. I'll be using Castrol Edge Professional in it.

I can believe the boost figure, how else are you going to make 2.24 HP per cube and 210 lb/ft out of a 1.3L motor? It's a pretty astounding set of numbers when you think about it! It's a serious overachiever so far.
 

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39.7 psi of boost? I'm kind of doubting that. I mean GDI block design should allow you to push more pressure, but going from ~21 - near 40 on pump gas?


39.7:1 effective compression ratio under full boost? I could believe that.

The garrett calculator seems to think you could get there with 16.5psi of boost if you had the right turbo. Go with a smaller turbo for less lag, I could see hitting peak output mid band, and starting to choke as you get near redline while pushing 20ish psi with the engine actually running away a bit to 22-25.
 

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The air filter housing appears to be under the engine cover on ours. That's where the inlet from the core support runs.

39.7 psi would probably be absolute pressure, not boost. As in, 14.7 psi of atmospheric plus 25 psi of boost equals 39.7. People don't always consider that when thinking of pressure, but the pressures stack. 25 psi of boost is about what I would expect to get to those power levels. That's a max number for sea level I'm sure.

Our Mustang ecoboost runs about 25 psi (modified) at peak output also but it makes a lot more power obviously. It's about at the limits for the stock turbo. The turbo on the 1.3 appears to be small in order to get to peak TQ output so quickly, so it's probably not optimized for peak HP numbers.

I've seen a dyno of the 1.3 online, and it looks like it makes a great deal of it's peak TQ by 2000 RPM, and then hits max before 3000 RPM. Like we've been doing on modern Volvos for 15 years now, it then makes it's peak TQ for a long time using the electronic waste gate to hold the TQ even until it starts to drop a little after 5300 RPM. The TQ curve isn't a curve, it's a flat line from 2750 to 5300.

We hit 1470 miles this morning, and I can tell you from the way it drives it makes it's power down low. It likes to drive between 2000 and 3000 RPM, making a great deal of TQ by 2000. It's counter-intuitive that such a small motor would be so biased to low end, but it really drives like a larger engine and it's quiet for daily driving. It's a really good match for the chassis in my opinion. My wife loves it also. As long as it turns out to have a decent lifespan, I'll be happy with it.
 

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The air filter housing appears to be under the engine cover on ours. That's where the inlet from the core support runs.

39.7 psi would probably be absolute pressure, not boost. As in, 14.7 psi of atmospheric plus 25 psi of boost equals 39.7. People don't always consider that when thinking of pressure, but the pressures stack. 25 psi of boost is about what I would expect to get to those power levels. That's a max number for sea level I'm sure.

Our Mustang ecoboost runs about 25 psi (modified) at peak output also but it makes a lot more power obviously. It's about at the limits for the stock turbo. The turbo on the 1.3 appears to be small in order to get to peak TQ output so quickly, so it's probably not optimized for peak HP numbers.

I've seen a dyno of the 1.3 online, and it looks like it makes a great deal of it's peak TQ by 2000 RPM, and then hits max before 3000 RPM. Like we've been doing on modern Volvos for 15 years now, it then makes it's peak TQ for a long time using the electronic waste gate to hold the TQ even until it starts to drop a little after 5300 RPM. The TQ curve isn't a curve, it's a flat line from 2750 to 5300.

We hit 1470 miles this morning, and I can tell you from the way it drives it makes it's power down low. It likes to drive between 2000 and 3000 RPM, making a great deal of TQ by 2000. It's counter-intuitive that such a small motor would be so biased to low end, but it really drives like a larger engine and it's quiet for daily driving. It's a really good match for the chassis in my opinion. My wife loves it also. As long as it turns out to have a decent lifespan, I'll be happy with it.
OK I can see that logic for total pressure. I don't think it is a generally accepted way of stating it though. There are a couple factory setups on cars that if not daily driver type vehicles are at least daily driver adjacent that approach/hit 25 psi on pump gas. Heck, there have been setups intended to peak at ~17psi that use small turbos and will start to runaway in top gear to 23+ before the ECU really ends the fun.

And torque mesas are the best kind of torque curve unless you can just keep it going up and up.

Folks usually don't list the total pressure because all the measuring devices you generally have tend to ignore ambient air pressure.
 

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OK I can see that logic for total pressure. I don't think it is a generally accepted way of stating it though. There are a couple factory setups on cars that if not daily driver type vehicles are at least daily driver adjacent that approach/hit 25 psi on pump gas. Heck, there have been setups intended to peak at ~17psi that use small turbos and will start to runaway in top gear to 23+ before the ECU really ends the fun.

And torque mesas are the best kind of torque curve unless you can just keep it going up and up.

Folks usually don't list the total pressure because all the measuring devices you generally have tend to ignore ambient air pressure.
I work at a Euro brand dealership, and that's the way the engine management systems look at intake pressure, by reading "absolute" pressure, not boost. They also reference ambient pressure from outside the intake system and some monitor pre and post throttle pressures. If you're reading psi off a gauge it will show "boost" pressure as "zero" on the guage is assumed to be ambient. This changes with a lot of variables however, so the ECM is looking for current ambient and absolute manifold to calculate fuel and spark table values. Since that was a bit of a tech paper for early information about the engine, I could see them stating it that way. There's no way a 39.7 boost engine could every possibly run on anything less than pure race gas, probably methanol for that kind of boost, so I'm pretty sure that's what's being referenced.

When you look at MAP sensors for turbo applications, you'll see 2 and 3 bar sensors usually. A "bar" is a barometric, roughly 14.7 psi. A 3 bar sensor is 2 bars of pressure, 1 bar of atmospheric, meaning that it will work for a roughly 30 psi max boost application. It needs to be able to read 3 "bars" so that it can read vacuum, as vacuum is simply a lower level of pressure versus atmospheric. It's still positive pressure versus "zero". Approx 30 inches of vacuum is "0" bar.

I've tuned engine management on a dyno from scratch for turbo applications also. Used to build race engines and went to school for it. It's a neat field, but pay turned out not to be great so I went back to tech-ing. I still do the odd engine build or cylinder head build or repair work on the side.
 

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Oh, and by the way, order your oil filters early and get on the list. I found out 2 days ago that the dealers locally have the filters on back order with no ETA nationally. I got my name on the list for a couple. Hoping I get a filter before I need to change my oil.
 

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Just got a couple filters on Friday. Back order came in. I have 3200 miles on it already, and I'll change it at 5K. So far, no noticeable change in oil level from new. Both of us still really liking the motor.
 

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Thanks for all the info on the new engine
I ordered a limited on March 8 and still waiting for delivery
I currently have a 2016 Limited and the engine is adequate but it doesn’t go up hills too well especially with the air-conditioning on
Your posts have given me hope
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Could you post up an oil filter part number, and the oil specs? I can't seem to find anything for our 1.3
 

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Could you post up an oil filter part number, and the oil specs? I can't seem to find anything for our 1.3
just got my filters after a one month wait. mopar part number 6843 9517 aa, number on th filter 46337528. these are made in France. I could not find a cross referenced filter as of now, will keep looking. 0w-30 sn+ oil is also hard to find. I settled on 5w30 sn+ for now.
 

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Love my 1.3L!
Having a hard time with the oil. I can't find any SN+ 0W30s besides Mobil 1 AFE, which doesn't have the Mopar 13340 certification on it...just since FCA has an interest in Shell! LOL.
 

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Pennzoil is coming out with a 0w30. I think it will be named Maximum Power or somthing like that. Should be the same as the Mopar stuff. I think it will be coming out in November.
 

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I have Valvoline 5w30 waiting if I can't get the pennzoil. I will be doing the first oil change at 5000 miles have 3400 on it now. Love the 1.3t. Just a reminder to order your filters from the dealer soon, mine took a month to get here. Most auto parts stores had no listing or the wrong listing for it.
 

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Did the first one at the dealer 4100 miles. Was in for wind noise/whistling and had them do it.
 

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Just did my oil change tonight at 2620 miles. Used Mobil 1 AFE 0W30, SN+. Easy oil change, skid plate wasn't that bad to take off.
 
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