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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having watched the 4xe for 6 months or so, we decided to purchase a low mileage ex-demonstrator vehicle. The user reviews available at the time were usually done by a blogger that has been offered the vehicle for a day or 2 and didn't really offer the 'owner experience' we wanted to hear about. Hence the reason for hopefully informing those on this forum that might be tempted.

Firstly, for background, we upgraded from a 2.0l Diesel Tough Mudder version (the Renegade 4x4 capabilities ideally suit the snow conditions we get here in the hilly part of northern England). The manufacturer's warranty was about to expire and the electric capabilities suited the wife's 8 mile round trip commute to work.

The ride is much like the previous Renegade. Haven't had a chance to try the 4x4 element as it hasn't snowed since we purchased but I suspect it would be on a par with the previous (which was quite impressive and why we decided to stick with the Jeep name). Uconnect 8.4" is a vast improvement on the 5" previous one with the addition of the data connection allowing remote interaction (changing charge schedule, remote switching of cabin conditioning etc). Frustratingly the Send n Go function for the SatNav has not been implemented yet in the UK (a function I use all the time on my other vehicle). This information doesn't seem to be readily available on any of the Jeep/Fiat customer/technical assistance website's and I only found this out by contacting FCA directly.

The interior only has slight subtle changes from the previous Renegade (these changes are probably seen in the latest non-hybrid versions, I haven't investigated those variants).

The big area lacking in other reviews is the day to day economy, the reason being the economy varies wildly. For my wife's daily commute, we are getting pretty close to 'the' 26 miles on a battery charge. We live in the hills which does have an impact on the battery life (although the braking and coasting regeneration systems do a pretty decent job in topping the battery up). I'd say we get about 22-23 miles out of a charge with no heating or Aircon on. Obviously those will affect the mileage. So you could say we are getting 'Infinite' mpg. But 26miles is not realistic range so you eventually need hybrid mode for longer journeys.
From our 4 weeks experience with the vehicle, I assessed 2 journey's. A 50 mile journey and a 90 mile journey. Both had undulating hills predominantly. Electric was the dominant hybrid mode initially (aside from a couple of steeper uphill portions where the petrol engine kicked in). At a shade over the 25 mile mark, the battery was more or less at 3% and the combination of petrol or electrical engine did the driving depending on how much regeneration had taken place into the battery. At approx 45 miles on the 90 mile journey the mpg dipped below 99.9 (the highest displayed figure. Anything above that is a guess). The recorded figure at the end of 90 miles was 60mpg (not sure if that's US or Imp). On the 50 mile round trip, the consumption was 80mpg but this journey did have more hills in general. Both journeys were driven in a conservative manner.
We haven't yet taken it on a journey in excess of 100 miles but looking at the instantaneous consumption, it ranges between 6mpg (heavy acceleration) to 70mpg (flat road at suburban speeds). My estimate would be somewhere around the 35-45mpg depending on variables (less if you want to use the full armoury of 240hp).

It does shift more abruptly than the 2.0l Diesel version we had, which we were also pleased with.

My only reservation is the petrol engine, when needed, can kick in from cold to delivering 3-4000rpm. I'm not sure this is ideal. It can also be a little excitable in its rpm management.

Conclusion. You really need to use the battery to warrant purchasing. The much higher price tag doesn't warrant the extra hp in my opinion. Therefore on longer journey's this becomes a burden. We charge with a standard house socket and it charges overnight (usually within 5 1/2 hours on a reduced amperage charging schedule we set up and when the electricity rates are lower). We haven't purchased a quick charge lead (which we would need for away from home charging) but it is limited to 7.3kw so if you wanted a charge when on a journey it would take circa 90mins. It does suit us due to the ability to not use petrol at all for my wife's commute. It would definitely suit an urban situation but in that case, the models down from the Trailhawk (which don't have Rock 4x4 mode) would suffice.

There's an insight anyway. If you want any more info please feel free to PM me.
 

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Thanks for posting and please keep us updated.
 

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Thanks for this. Was looking at 4Xe. May possible be tempted back into the Alfa when it comes out. Even 25miles full electric is enough for my daily commute.
 

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Hi, I'm enjoying my 4xe Trailhawk so far with two weeks of ownership. I share the erratic rev view, it does take getting used to. I'm also sure that I'm overanalysing the battery / petrol mixed use.

I'm still learning, so I'll probably revise this view with time......
Pros:
It'll do 80mph on electric only.
The heater and aircon are entirely electric. You can run either without the engine on and fire them up on a remote schedule.
The combined 240bhp is a hoot.


Cons:
The heater and aircon are entirely electric. You burn battery to use either, and this will eat into range.
I wish it would let me set a minimum battery value higher than 1%, because I want it for overtaking and for 4WD capability. Maybe this is catered for in the 1%, but I haven't discovered that yet.
 

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Many thanks for your detailed report and I am sure it will be appreciated by the more "Green Brigade" members.

My opinion is that car manufacturers have not just quite, got it correct with Green cars. My thoughts will never be changed and I will remain a diesel driver for as long as possible.

All this conservation sh1t, imho is a load of hogswash by a few Govermental department buffoons, sorry boffins. Aimed at making the ricj=h even richer and the poor people like you and I having to suffer and pay the additional outrageous costs to simply save the worlds ozone.

The world has been here for billions of years and likely billions more to come and here we are worrying about my wee diesel Jeep needing to be replaced by hybrids and likely in the future, all electric but where will it end?

Oh wait. Hydrogen from water, the concept is available but are the "rich" corporate companies like, Shell, Esso, BP etc going to ever allow such a concept to reduce their profits?

To get back on track, if you want an electric car then go buy a "dodgem" that they use at the kiddies funfare for at the moment imho thats all they are good for.
 

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I used to be a determined petrol head. I've had plenty of V8s and V6s. But whatever max torque an electric vehicle has, you get the whole lot, right away from 0mph. It's pretty addictive. You don't have to think about it, rev it up, or mess with launch control, tap the throttle and you launch.

Quiet too. My current problem is how to avoid running over my sunbathing cat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To get back on track, if you want an electric car then go buy a "dodgem" that they use at the kiddies funfare for at the moment imho thats all they are good for.
You are quite wrong I'm afraid. I am by no means advocating that fossil fuel vehicles are responsible for hastening and catastrophic climate change. But you are making assessments on a vehicle that you won't entertain because of personal bias. This vehicle is quite versatile and we have found it suits our needs well. You don't have to embrace the technology yourself and you won't be judged for that. But commenting on a vehicle without any experience of it is disingenuous.

After 4 months of use I have to say it is proving to be a lot of fun. My only concern is how it will perform in 5 years time.
 

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My only concern is how it will perform in 5 years time.
Now you understand where I am coming from.

My diesel vehicles have all been tried and tested and have stood the test of time.

Maybe I will think differently in 5 years.

What annoys me most is the amount of "energy" that is wasted and harms the environment whilst making all the component parts of the batteries etc. on electric vehicles. You certainly don't hear nor read of Goverments decrying the pollution for this type of project. Yet it has been proven to have adverse effects.

Personally I have no interest in global pollution. The world will be here when you and I and all our family for their lifetimes will be long gone. I am not starting nor hijacking the thread for global pollution but the world has been here for 4.543 billion years and I am quite sure we will have no dramatic effect with our carbon fuelled and electric vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What annoys me most is the amount of "energy" that is wasted and harms the environment whilst making all the component parts of the batteries etc. on electric vehicles. You certainly don't hear nor read of Goverments decrying the pollution for this type of project. Yet it has been proven to have adverse effects.
Agree wholeheartedly. There isn't a widely available way to deal with 'Dead' batteries. There are a few recycling plants around but with the exponential increase in electric cars (of all varieties), there does seem to be a concern we will instigate a future disaster in an effort to overcome a current one (if the global warming is being accelerated dramatically by man). And the energy required to extract the elements from these surely would be significant. Then there is the mining of the raw elements to produce the original product.

But we are stuck with the current path as lowly end users. I had a quick glance and it appears the only 4wd option available in the Renegade now is the 4xe. There are no diesel powered variants at all now. I did like my diesel 4wd Rene. But the 4xe is a highly capable replacement. We are getting a lot more power with more economy (if you charge the battery up). Even with a depleted battery I'd say it was on a par or slightly better than the Diesel. You could get approx 250miles out of a full tank and battery (depending how you drove it). We really like the options it gives us but that could easily turn to hate if the product isn't robust enough. Only time will tell us that.
 

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You could get approx 250miles out of a full tank and battery (depending how you drove it).
That's not enough to get me a return journey to the caravan an a side trip for the wife to the local harbour.

Then you have the recharging time to address.

By the time it's all sorted I will likely be dead anyway :p:LOL:
 

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Thank you for the real life experience. We are looking at a limited 4xe but concerned the range won't be sufficient for longer motorway journeys. We can currently get from the Lake District back home (Berkshire) no problem with the 1.6 diesel Renegade.

Thoughts on max range, motorway cruising in a 4xe?

Like you, Mon - Friday are local short commutes now but weekends will see longer journeys to hillier parts of the UK
 
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