Jeep Renegade Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No, have you tried searching on performance parts websites? Are you trying to stance out your Renegade, I mean what do you need more camber adjustment for?
im trying to get rid of the negative camber in the rear. it bothers me. im kinda anal about all my cars alignments
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Taken from toaster jeep forum:
"The only issue I can see people running into is the rear wheel alignment.
This Jeep Renegade is a new vehicle, the mechanics trying to align your jeep may have never seen this vehicle before. It's understandable that they don't know the adjustment points. So, make sure to tell the mechanic (not the sales person, the Mechanic) that both trailing arms are adjustable. The rear trailing arm is obvious, it's a camber bolt. The mechanics see this and take a quick look at the forward trailing arm and say 'there's only one adjustment point and it's maxed out'. Wrong! The forward trailing arm is a slide, the large washer covers the fact. At a quick look it's easy to miss. Tell the mechanic that both trailing arms are adjustable and (if the mechanic is worth his/hers paycheck) you will have no problems."
The arm to the front of the rear axle, however, appears to just be a normal bolt. Your'e mechanic might not realize it's adjustable (my Jeep dealer missed it) But it is, the hole it goes thru isn't a hole but an oval. The square washer hides this fact. When you loosen the bolt you can slide the arm's pivot point in and out. Between the two arms you can adjust toe and camber, and get them into spec ."
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
factory settings. the front is fine. the rear is the problem
I wouldn't say its a problem, the rear negative camber makes the vehicle more stable around turns, I appreciate the factory settings, this jeep handles like a little hatchback and not a top-heavy typical jeep!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,154 Posts
I wouldn't say its a problem, the rear negative camber makes the vehicle more stable around turns, I appreciate the factory settings, this jeep handles like a little hatchback and not a top-heavy typical jeep!
That I agree with. Surprising how nimble it is for what it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Taken from toaster jeep forum:
"The only issue I can see people running into is the rear wheel alignment.
This Jeep Renegade is a new vehicle, the mechanics trying to align your jeep may have never seen this vehicle before. It's understandable that they don't know the adjustment points. So, make sure to tell the mechanic (not the sales person, the Mechanic) that both trailing arms are adjustable. The rear trailing arm is obvious, it's a camber bolt. The mechanics see this and take a quick look at the forward trailing arm and say 'there's only one adjustment point and it's maxed out'. Wrong! The forward trailing arm is a slide, the large washer covers the fact. At a quick look it's easy to miss. Tell the mechanic that both trailing arms are adjustable and (if the mechanic is worth his/hers paycheck) you will have no problems."
The arm to the front of the rear axle, however, appears to just be a normal bolt. Your'e mechanic might not realize it's adjustable (my Jeep dealer missed it) But it is, the hole it goes thru isn't a hole but an oval. The square washer hides this fact. When you loosen the bolt you can slide the arm's pivot point in and out. Between the two arms you can adjust toe and camber, and get them into spec ."


That is not the correct way to adjust camber on MacPherson strut based suspension. I'll continue searching...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
FYI, that's not the only problem with getting your alignment done. My Jeep dealer couldn't do the alignment at all because the computer program they use to determine the settings hasn't been updated to include the Renegade yet. And apparently they all use the same system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
FYI, that's not the only problem with getting your alignment done. My Jeep dealer couldn't do the alignment at all because the computer program they use to determine the settings hasn't been updated to include the Renegade yet. And apparently they all use the same system.

I do my own alignments with the Quick Trick Alignment System
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Does anyone know which camber bolts fit the rear of the renegade?

Sorry I haven't been on the forums in months. Catching up with all the inquiries. I couldn't find anyone selling camber bolts specifically for the Renegade. All the camber bolts are universal. You just have to find the one that fits the size of the stock bolt hole.

I don't know what size or bolt I purchased. I took the Renegade in for an alignment after the lift kit and the shop sourced the camber bolts from what they had on hand. They did the install and adjustment and I don't want to take the camber bolts off the measure them because the alignment is already done.

I did the alignment at Goodyear and bought the camber bolts from them, but paid a lot for them. I didn't want to figure out the size and wait to order them cheaper online, so I just paid a lot more for the ones they had on hand. Call ahead to your local Goodyear and make sure they have the stock alignment specs for the Renegade. It may take them a few days to get the specs from Jeep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Sorry I haven't been on the forums in months. Catching up with all the inquiries. I couldn't find anyone selling camber bolts specifically for the Renegade. All the camber bolts are universal. You just have to find the one that fits the size of the stock bolt hole.

I don't know what size or bolt I purchased. I took the Renegade in for an alignment after the lift kit and the shop sourced the camber bolts from what they had on hand. They did the install and adjustment and I don't want to take the camber bolts off the measure them because the alignment is already done.

I did the alignment at Goodyear and bought the camber bolts from them, but paid a lot for them. I didn't want to figure out the size and wait to order them cheaper online, so I just paid a lot more for the ones they had on hand. Call ahead to your local Goodyear and make sure they have the stock alignment specs for the Renegade. It may take them a few days to get the specs from Jeep.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Got this hardware for my Renny, front and rear camber adjustments: requires two kits/box sets to cover both axles (4 bolts) and their camber gauge for DYI adjustment
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I wouldn't say its a problem, the rear negative camber makes the vehicle more stable around turns, I appreciate the factory settings, this jeep handles like a little hatchback and not a top-heavy typical jeep!
oversteer scares passengers

understeer scares DRIVERS.

get rid of the excessive rear camber (especially if it's only FWD)!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
FYI, that's not the only problem with getting your alignment done. My Jeep dealer couldn't do the alignment at all because the computer program they use to determine the settings hasn't been updated to include the Renegade yet. And apparently they all use the same system.
i know this is old news, but you can always ask them to use another mac-strut FWD car. alignment specs on most "people hauling" vehicles are all withing .5 degrees (in any direction). there's no caster adjustment on these, i'm guessing, so what's to screw up? get toe (in) close to zero, get camber even front and back, what's the problem?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
oversteer scares passengers

understeer scares DRIVERS.

get rid of the excessive rear camber (especially if it's only FWD)!
I'll leave mine alone, and mine is a 4x4. I don't drive this jeep hard enough to experience understeer. I have only experienced oversteer when driving this in the snow/ice.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top