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Does Jeep Renegade have always on AWD or is it part time 4wd?
Here are two descriptions of the rear axle disconnect:

The “Active Drive” is primarily a front wheel drive vehicle with a disconnecting rear axle and power take off unit which will give it about the same fuel efficiency as a 4×2 model.
http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/04/renegade-impressions
FULL-ON FREEDOM. Two available 4x4 systems are instilled
with legendary Jeep® brand DNA. Choose the fully automatic
Jeep Active Drive,TM or get extra tough with Trail Rated® Jeep
Active Drive Low.TM Both systems feature a class-exclusive2
rear axle disconnect that helps to improve fuel efficiency
when 4x4 capability isn’t needed. Selec-Terrain,® a standard
traction management system on 4x4 models, helps achieve
best-in-class1 Trail Rated capability.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...4UOfSV0WyD8wJcQ&bvm=bv.81828268,d.aWw&cad=rjt
 

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Just wondering if it will be more like a Subaru or more like my old Liberty.
Constructed more like the Subaru, behaves more like the liberty. It's its own thing and really significantly different than both if the marketing material is to be believed.
 

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Constructed more like the Subaru, behaves more like the liberty. It's its own thing and really significantly different than both if the marketing material is to be believed.


Actually I agree that it'll be it's own animal. Not like the Liberty at all. The Liberty is a traditional Jeep. Solid rear axle. Rear wheel drive. Real transfer case. Little to no traction control (until later model years). Just a totally different thing from the Renegade which is front wheel drive, has no transfer case, and will be constructed very flimsy compared to the Liberty.


The Renegade will be much more like a Subaru than anything else.
 

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Uhh how will it not have a transfer case? You have to take the power of the transaxle somehow. Subarus have a transfer case it's just arranged differently than your average truck.

Heck even the Subaru stuff is different across generations and options.
 

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I haven't studied it in detail, but the Patriot/Compass don't have a transfer case. The low range on the trail rated models is achieved through transmission trickery.
 

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The Renegade "Transfer Case" is really two separate units, not part of the transmission. If you search for images of the front transaxle, you will see the "PTU - Power Take Off Unit", even when there is no transmission installed, in the front transaxle. This video of the 500x shows the drvietrain, which is shared with the Renegade:

Check at 32 seconds in:
PTU - Power Take Off Unit
RDM - Rear Drive Module

http://www.jeeprenegadeforum.com/fo...eline/4929-renegade-drivetrain.html#post46433

http://youtu.be/BtHnHdlifx8
 

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I haven't studied it in detail, but the Patriot/Compass don't have a transfer case. The low range on the trail rated models is achieved through transmission trickery.
I see the problem. You are mistaking what a transfer case does. You are used to a traditional part-time 4wd transfer case.

It's a case of all squares are rhombuses but not all rhombuses are squares.

Transfer cases are the power take off, and often where your center differential or equivalent are contained, but not always. It's also where a chunk of "logic" tends to live. That "logic" may be you pushing and pulling levers, a one time decision on the fluid used in a viscous coupling, the gears used in a torsen style center diff, actual software with an electronically controlled clutch pack, etc.

And yes, the patriot has a transfer case, jsut do a google image search. One of those things poking out of it connects to the power take off of the transmission.
 

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Just stumbled upon this article, granted it is three months old but what is interesting is I've never seen mention of "the unique Chrysler magnetic disconnection system" Has anyone heard of it or know more about it?

All of the Renegade models will feature all-wheel drive and will utilize the unique Chrysler magnetic disconnection system to allow the vehicle to become front-wheel driven to improve fuel economy. This switch is done automatically, without user input, and the Renegade will go back to four-wheel drive as needed.

http://www.carnewscafe.com/2014/08/29/goodbye-compass-night-new-jeep-renegade/
 

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Just stumbled upon this article, granted it is three months old but what is interesting is I've never seen mention of "the unique Chrysler magnetic disconnection system" Has anyone heard of it or know more about it?


Yes, as I was saying, the Liberty used a real transfer case. Small Jeeps since then do not. They simply are front wheel drive cars that can connect or disconnect the rear axle when needed for four wheel drive. The low range is done with trickery inside the transmission. There is not a separate transfer case like we've seen for the last 75 years on 4x4s. This brings some advantages but many disadvantages also.


With the Cherokee/Renegade Jeep is trying all new things in the segment such as the dog gears they used in the Cherokee, which were very problematic at first and this magnetic system on the Renegade which will likely have bugs at first. Only time will tell if these new tricky systems will last 200,000 miles. I personally don't expect them to survive as long as traditional systems like the Wrangler still uses.
 

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Y There is not a separate transfer case like we've seen for the last 75 years on 4x4s. This brings some advantages but many disadvantages also.
Dude, seriously. There IS a transfer case. It is indeed separate unless you count bolts securing things as not separate, but then your transfer case of the last 75 years schtick needs redefining too.

Patriot transfer case.





The fact that it is engineered to mate up with a transversely mounted engine and transaxle is irrelevant to it being a separate unit and, in fact, a transfer case.

Saying it is 'transmission trickery' that is FWD and connects the rear wheels is not really different from saying 4x4s of the past are rwd vehicles that connect and disconnect the front wheels. Do you really think that transfer cases of old are not squarely in the category of transmission trickery?

Is it a more lightweight build? Yes. Does it do gear reduction with multiple gear ratios in the transfer case? No. Older systems tended to.

There are a whole mess of approaches to driving all 4 wheels. There is very little of technical merit that is universally implied in 4x4 vs. AWD vs. 4WD. There are systems designed to drive all 4 wheels that are designed with a specific application in mind. There are even setups out there with single speed transfer cases as usually found in road oriented all wheel drive systems, where there is a high and low range gear reduction that is done outside of the transfer case, that are geared towards serious off road use and NOTHING else. They just do the "transmission trickery" in the hubs with gear reduction hubs.

There are a lot of systems and setups, even in production retail vehicles, and simply dividing them into two groups that work alike mechanically isn't really useful. If you generalize enough to do that, you should probably just continue on to one as the commonalities between the different systems on the different sides of the divide are likely to be the same as the commonalities between both sides of the divide.

Where you will see some genuine divides comes down to the intended use captured in the design. When 4wd or 4x4 is uses, usually what is implied is that the design is constructed in a manner where all the wheels are not intended to be driven on paved surfaces or other surfaces with adequate traction other than in a straight line. All the wheels are intended to be driven only on loose surfaces or traction impaired surfaces. Usually the system is designed with a relatively low upper speed limit in mind. Usually, operating it outside those parameters will wear some portion of the veicle faster if not cause outright damage. When AWD is used, it is usually meant that operation of the system is designed to cope with driving all wheels on paved surfaces at highway speeds, and that the system is set up to deal with intermittent loss of traction rather than continuous operation on loose surfaces.

Is the renegade constructed with components usually reserved for systems that fall into the AWD category? Yes, and the durability of said system is likely more on par with traditional AWD systems rather than traditional 4x4 systems. Is the systemic design set up to operate in a manner consistent with how AWD is usually applied? No, at least not if the press releases are to be believed. In coping with highway speeds, the primary strategy is to run with the primary drive axles engaged and the secondary drive axles disengaged, just like traditional 4x4 systems. The secondary drive axles are engaged to deal with traction compromised surfaces or loose surfaces. The primary difference is that in traditional 4x4 systems, driver intervention is required to make the shift. One of the benefits of using technology traditionally used to implement AWD strategies for driving all 4 wheels is that you can make the human interaction optional and let a CPU make decisions based on CPU input.
 

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Dude, seriously. There IS a transfer case.
WXman,
Amazing that every yardstick you use is the Wrangler, yes, this is a Wrangler Transfer case:




NEWS FLASH:
Mankind around the world discovered other ways to transfer power from front to back THAT WAS NOT BASED ON THE WRANGLER!!!

It is amazing that you are obviously interested in buying a Renegade, but a high percentage of you posts, here and at Allpar, you just bash the Renegade, WHY?
 
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This forum is finally getting good.
 
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Yes, as I was saying, the Liberty used a real transfer case. Small Jeeps since then do not. They simply are front wheel drive cars that can connect or disconnect the rear axle when needed for four wheel drive. The low range is done with trickery inside the transmission. There is not a separate transfer case like we've seen for the last 75 years on 4x4s. This brings some advantages but many disadvantages also.


With the Cherokee/Renegade Jeep is trying all new things in the segment such as the dog gears they used in the Cherokee, which were very problematic at first and this magnetic system on the Renegade which will likely have bugs at first. Only time will tell if these new tricky systems will last 200,000 miles. I personally don't expect them to survive as long as traditional systems like the Wrangler still uses.
The "Magnetic System" system you refer to has been in use since the Patriot/Compass inception. The Renegade is the same thing it's just been enhanced and expanded to use more interface with the stability and traction control. My Patriots held up quite well thanks.
The problem I keep seeing on this forum is people want to use the Renegade for things the Wrangler was built for and yes that will cause you problems in the end. They are not apples to apples no matter how you look at it. I'm a Jeep guy I know what Jeep to use for what. The drive train in my Patriot is more comforting in the snow than the drive train in my Liberty, how ever if I'm going off road the Liberty would win out. Does that make one better than the other not really. You don't take a crappie fishing rig to catch sharks!

@RAZ-O nice post ;)
 

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This forum is finally getting good.
I agree.

It's great to see that we have a good number of knowledgeable members here sharing valuable information, and to think that this is just the beginning :D

Over time this forum will blow up, considering it's current state is just during the initial process :D
 

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I do not know much about the mechanical parts of cars. I hope someone on this forum would know how to answer my question. I had a 2008 mercedes c300 4 matic. This was the first year this model was produced. At approximately 79,000 miles mercedes told me my transfer case was leaking and needed to be resealed. I paid $1200 to reseal it and a year later they told me the bearings on the transfer case were worn out and metal shavings were going into the oil. The transfer case and the transmission are sold as one unit. They told me I needed a whole new transmission for $7000. Is the Renegade made with the same type of transfer case that you would need a whole new transmission?
 

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I do not know much about the mechanical parts of cars. I hope someone on this forum would know how to answer my question. I had a 2008 mercedes c300 4 matic. This was the first year this model was produced. At approximately 79,000 miles mercedes told me my transfer case was leaking and needed to be resealed. I paid $1200 to reseal it and a year later they told me the bearings on the transfer case were worn out and metal shavings were going into the oil. The transfer case and the transmission are sold as one unit. They told me I needed a whole new transmission for $7000. Is the Renegade made with the same type of transfer case that you would need a whole new transmission?
The Renegade's AWD system is pretty heavily integrated, but not with the transmission. At this time, the cost for the transfer case is ~ $1200 and the cost for the rear drive unit is ~$1200. (that's if I go order it form someone with decent prices, the invoice on my warranty replacement of the rear drive unit IIRC was $1540). The transfer case is listed as a separate part# from the transmission, although you would likely need to remove all sorts of stuff to get it out of the vehicle, and those prices do not include labor.
 
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