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Discussion Starter #1
The Renegade comes with an electonic parking brake as standard equipment, as does the new Cherokee. I don't know if both models use the same system or not, however, that is immaterial to my question (I think): How do these electronic brake systems work? Are they electrically powered on, or off, and what happens if there is a power failure, battery disconnected, car inactive for awhile? Does anyone have some real world experience to share?
 

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Salesman (one whom I can trust) says that for the 2015 model year, new safety features have been added. You can now use the electronic brake as an old fashioned emergency brake if you need to without fear of locking the brakes completely up and crashing. There is an electric solenoid that activates the brakes when you flip the lever. As far as real world daily experience, you should search the Cherokee forums and ask owners there...they can tell you if they like the system or not. Personally, I think it could potentially have lots of advantages, like no more cables that can freeze, stick, and break. No more adjustments needed periodically. Less complexity to changing brake shoes/pads. That kind of thing.
 

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Salesman (one whom I can trust) says that for the 2015 model year, new safety features have been added. You can now use the electronic brake as an old fashioned emergency brake if you need to without fear of locking the brakes completely up and crashing. There is an electric solenoid that activates the brakes when you flip the lever. As far as real world daily experience, you should search the Cherokee forums and ask owners there...they can tell you if they like the system or not. Personally, I think it could potentially have lots of advantages, like no more cables that can freeze, stick, and break. No more adjustments needed periodically. Less complexity to changing brake shoes/pads. That kind of thing.
Great info WXman, thanks, good to understand how it works.
 

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I would guess that the risks of electronics failures is probably less than the potential risks of the mechanical brake. I mean if it wasn't than I wouldn't see much use in Jeep making the change in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I found this with Google from an FCA website:

Electric parking brake (EPB): Utilizes parking brake switch mounted in the center console, a motor on caliper (MOC) at each rear wheel and an electronic control module. Four modes of operation: static apply and release, dynamic apply, drive away release and safe hold

There are also several threads on the Cherokee forum (including a few oh-shits).
 

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Hello,
by my Renegade, the electric brake-switch was defect before 4 weeks. So I can not releasing the parking-brake with the switch. I must start the enginge and pull out the Renegade.
This method only works, when the Renegade is standing with his rear on a wall, not when he stand with the front on a wall. ;-)
The spare part takes 2 weeks an the integration takes 1 hour. Anyway the issure was free for me.
Regards, Marian

Sorry for my badly english :-(
 

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The Renegade comes with an electonic parking brake as standard equipment, as does the new Cherokee. I don't know if both models use the same system or not, however, that is immaterial to my question (I think): How do these electronic brake systems work? Are they electrically powered on, or off, and what happens if there is a power failure, battery disconnected, car inactive for awhile? Does anyone have some real world experience to share?
About electric failure.
European hand book (in English), page 101:

"IMPORTANT Should the vehicle battery be faulty, to unlock the electric parking
brake the battery must be replaced."
 

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About electric failure.
European hand book (in English), page 101:

"IMPORTANT Should the vehicle battery be faulty, to unlock the electric parking
brake the battery must be replaced."
That means to me the brake works on an open circuit. So it must need power to keep from engaging the brakes.... That would make sense then if the Jeep sits for a period of time or the battery dies it wont going rolling down a hill or something.
 

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.
About electric failure.
European hand book (in English), page 101:

"IMPORTANT Should the vehicle battery be faulty, to unlock the electric parking
brake the battery must be replaced."

That means to me the brake works on an open circuit. So it must need power to keep from engaging the brakes.... That would make sense then if the Jeep sits for a period of time or the battery dies it wont going rolling down a hill or something.
Or the brake works with a motor like a screw. Motor screws forward to engage and motor screws in reverse to disengage.
.
 

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The electronic parking brake engage automatically when the car is turned off. So the day the battery is dead, the car can not be moved. So we better have room in our garages to change the battery on site!
 

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The electronic parking brake engage automatically when the car is turned off. So the day the battery is dead, the car can not be moved. So we better have room in our garages to change the battery on site!
It helps to have a portable booster, I think some can even provide enough power to work a function like that for a bit.
 

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Automatic Car Wash

As there is no option to switch off the Electronic Parking Brake, which automatically engages every time you shut off the engine, it gets a bit tricky when you want to run the car through an automatic car wash.

In essence, to overcome this automatic engagement, you have to switch on the instruments but DO NOT start the engine. You then disengage the parking while stepping on the brake. However, you then have to leave the instrument panel activated.

How long it will stay in this mode is not clear but at least it lasted until the car came out the other end. More importantly, this process is not intuitive and will no doubt drive the average car wash guy bonkers.

This may also be the reason that towing is not recommended as the vehicle may switch itself back to a lock mode after some unknown period of time. Not fun if you happen to be doing 65mph believing that your new Renegade is happily following your big Winnebago just before it decides to slam on the brakes.

Anyone have any real life experiences with Jeep's system or know how it is actually supposed to work. The owner's manual seems to be less than helpful on this little nuance.
 

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I have been through a lot of car washes in my life and have NEVER shut off the engine while going through any car wash..
 

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I have been through a lot of car washes in my life and have NEVER shut off the engine while going through any car wash..
Unfortunately, in Hungary you are required to shut off the engine. Took me a while to figure out how to get through without the engine and with 3 annoyed guys queued up behind me. IN any case, there must be a more obvious solution or I am just missing something in how this system should work.
 

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There's another issue. My Renegade (manual) wouldn't start today. Sounded like the starter motor; thought maybe the battery was flat... No; after about an hour, I tried releasing the automatic hillstart e-brake activation and finally, the car started. I'm kind of scared to re-activate the hill-start function again but I guess I will need it soon. Reading these posts, the e-handbrake sound as if it might cause more problems than it solves! Lovely little car otherwise though.
 

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There's another issue. My Renegade (manual) wouldn't start today. Sounded like the starter motor; thought maybe the battery was flat... No; after about an hour, I tried releasing the automatic hillstart e-brake activation and finally, the car started. I'm kind of scared to re-activate the hill-start function again but I guess I will need it soon. Reading these posts, the e-handbrake sound as if it might cause more problems than it solves! Lovely little car otherwise though.
Just hope Jeep further refines them as time goes on and goes about dealing with that the right way.

At least you love it aside from the downsides mentioned.
 

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Probably a good idea of have a battery tender if it's going to be parked for some time... or one of those small portable battery jump packs (that can also charge phones) so you're not left stranded. Like this one:


Calling for a tow truck for a jump can cost over $100.
 

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For the US Lattitude version, you CAN turn off the auto e-brake engaging on shutoff through the Uconnect System. I can absolutely confirm that as it's the first customizing I did after making a stop on the way home from picking up my car at the dealership and driving a few miles with it on!
 

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Electronic Emergency Brake means Flat Bed Towing.

Salesman (one whom I can trust) says that for the 2015 model year, new safety features have been added. You can now use the electronic brake as an old fashioned emergency brake if you need to without fear of locking the brakes completely up and crashing. There is an electric solenoid that activates the brakes when you flip the lever. As far as real world daily experience, you should search the Cherokee forums and ask owners there...they can tell you if they like the system or not. Personally, I think it could potentially have lots of advantages, like no more cables that can freeze, stick, and break. No more adjustments needed periodically. Less complexity to changing brake shoes/pads. That kind of thing.
The Electronic Emergency Brake is a great idea.

I have one on my VW GTD, that's right it's a Turbo Diesel. We currently live in Australia. A place where almost every fuel station has diesel.

However, according to the owners manual, the Renegade is no longer towable without all four wheels off the ground.

This kind of thing ruins our hopes to use it as a "Toad" for our RV. We had planned to tow it behind our RV and utilize it's off-road capability to have fun as we travelled around the US and Canada.

Now, if we want to have the Renegade as our Toad, we will need to buy a small flat bed car hauler. This will add about $10,000 to our Renegade purchase, and not only make it WAY over-priced, but also, make it more cumbersome in utilizing the State and National Parks RV facilities.

It is a shame. The Renegade would have made an ideal Toad.

FCA really wants this vehicle to look the part in the City, but only if you don't need to transport it over long distances to have a greater variety in your off-road fun.

FCA has wiped out a very large and fast growing market segment. The marketing opportunity in young retirees who still have a little kick and who still feel adventurist.

I hope a smarter, more forward-looking auto manufacturer is developing just such a vehicle for this very lucrative market segment. Maybe with a DIESEL to add more torque and fuel efficiency.

We have to wait and see if another off-road Toad hops into the marketplace for this fast growing, and, now very pent up demand within a relatively affluent segment of the auto industry.

So I hope, Renegade buyers have a lot of places to off-road close to home.
 
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