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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know... it's early.


From Tire Rack (I've been using them since the early 80's)


Firestone Winterforce with studs, mounted on Borbet LV5 charcoal (aka: anthracite).


I went with completely stock sizes for my Trailhawk.
Tires are P215/65R17
Wheels are 17x7 with +40mm offset (5.47" backspacing) which I think is the same as my stock wheels (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong about that).


I tried one on for size and it's just like OEM. No change in stance, tire protuberance, height, etc.
 

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I know... it's early.


From Tire Rack (I've been using them since the early 80's)


Firestone Winterforce with studs, mounted on Borbet LV5 charcoal (aka: anthracite).


I went with completely stock sizes for my Trailhawk.
Tires are P215/65R17
Wheels are 17x7 with +40mm offset (5.47" backspacing) which I think is the same as my stock wheels (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong about that).


I tried one on for size and it's just like OEM. No change in stance, tire protuberance, height, etc.
Did you get TPMS sensors pre-installed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks! Excuse my ignorance when it comes to TPMS sensors, but will you have to go to the dealership to have them programmed to your Renegade or is there an "at-home" method?
No, that's a great question! I'm going on the assumption that they will register themselves with the car once they start going roundy-roundy.


I had to put the TH's full size spare on once already when I got a puncture. Within about a mile the spare tire's pressure replaced the flat's pressure on the display. It must work some magic when you rotate the tires too, so that it figures out which tire is in which location.


I'm not putting them on the car for a while yet, so it may be a few months before I can give a definitive answer (I HOPE!). If I can find this thread after I install them I'll post how it goes.
 

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Great choice of tires. I had four studded Winterforce tires on my rear wheel drive 2009 Challenger and could drive on any snow/ice covered road. Those tires were excellent.

I sacrificed the noise for the security of knowing I could make it up and down the 1 mile, 9% grade where I work. I easily made it to work some days that nobody else could.
 
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No, that's a great question! I'm going on the assumption that they will register themselves with the car once they start going roundy-roundy.


I had to put the TH's full size spare on once already when I got a puncture. Within about a mile the spare tire's pressure replaced the flat's pressure on the display. It must work some magic when you rotate the tires too, so that it figures out which tire is in which location.


I'm not putting them on the car for a while yet, so it may be a few months before I can give a definitive answer (I HOPE!). If I can find this thread after I install them I'll post how it goes.
You're probably correct about them "self-paring" when they go roundy-roundy :) I really like the idea of a spare set of winter tires. It's 50/50 that we'll have a really bad winter storm here. It probably won't snow a flake here (NC) since I now have a 4x4 :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You're probably correct about them "self-paring" when they go roundy-roundy :) I really like the idea of a spare set of winter tires. It's 50/50 that we'll have a really bad winter storm here. It probably won't snow a flake here (NC) since I now have a 4x4 :)
I've lived in the Northeast most of my life, but the two winters I lived in Charlotte, NC were the worst driving conditions I've ever encountered!
 

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I've lived in the Northeast most of my life, but the two winters I lived in Charlotte, NC were the worst driving conditions I've ever encountered!
When we get Wintry weather it's usually very icy. I had an Aunt from Anchorage, AK who was visiting here and we had a snowstorm. She laughed at us because of a "few inches of snow". But when she tried to drive in it, she came back and said "what is this s***!" She slipped around just like everyone else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
No, that's a great question! I'm going on the assumption that they will register themselves with the car once they start going roundy-roundy.


I had to put the TH's full size spare on once already when I got a puncture. Within about a mile the spare tire's pressure replaced the flat's pressure on the display. It must work some magic when you rotate the tires too, so that it figures out which tire is in which location.


I'm not putting them on the car for a while yet, so it may be a few months before I can give a definitive answer (I HOPE!). If I can find this thread after I install them I'll post how it goes.
So... I put them on today and the tire pressure monitor display showed the new sensor before I was a block down the road.
I let some air out of one tire just to be sure it was reading the new set. This is my first vehicle with actual pressure sensors (my VW just works off wheel RPM), so I'm not sure how the magic works - that the monitor knows which sensor is in which wheel - but it works.
 

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I live in Michigan where we get some pretty good snowstorms. I've never put snow tires on a 4X4 vehicle and never had trouble getting thru unless the snow was piled up so deep that I high-centered. Michigan has not allowed studded snow tires for almost 40 years so a good all season tire has been my choice. The one condition where nothing can move is rain over ice. It's best just to leave your vehicle in the garage when that happens. Studded tires would be a big help in that situation but fortunately, we don't see a lot of that here.

If I had a rear wheel drive vehicle I would definitely go with snow tires along with loading some weight in the back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I live in Michigan where we get some pretty good snowstorms. I've never put snow tires on a 4X4 vehicle and never had trouble getting thru unless the snow was piled up so deep that I high-centered. Michigan has not allowed studded snow tires for almost 40 years so a good all season tire has been my choice. The one condition where nothing can move is rain over ice. It's best just to leave your vehicle in the garage when that happens. Studded tires would be a big help in that situation but fortunately, we don't see a lot of that here.

If I had a rear wheel drive vehicle I would definitely go with snow tires along with loading some weight in the back.
AWD does not help you stop in the snow. It maybe, if only a little bit, helps your steer.
I've put snow tires on one of my vehicles since the 1990's. This is my first year with studded tires. I just like the insurance they provide. I don't even drive my vehicle to/from work. I drive that crappy E-250 you see behind the Renegade. It sucks when it's slippy! I'd put snows on it too, but the company won't reimburse me. FYI: my second car is a Golf R (AWD): no snows on it.
 

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After a good deal of research, I got my winters installed as well this afternoon. They are the same WinterForce the OP started the thread with. However, we are not permitted studs in Ontario. They do seem to have a slightly harsher ride than the SR-A's. They also corner better. If the El Niño is like the last big one, we should see more ice than snow this year. The tire change should help for me.

To the OP... Good choice!
 

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AWD does not help you stop in the snow. It maybe, if only a little bit, helps your steer.
I've put snow tires on one of my vehicles since the 1990's. This is my first year with studded tires. I just like the insurance they provide. I don't even drive my vehicle to/from work. I drive that crappy E-250 you see behind the Renegade. It sucks when it's slippy! I'd put snows on it too, but the company won't reimburse me. FYI: my second car is a Golf R (AWD): no snows on it.
You get engine braking on all wheels, but yes tyres are more important.
 

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You get engine braking on all wheels, but yes tyres are more important.
Not unless you are in Snow/Mud etc. mode with the 4WD lock enabled. If not, engine braking is front wheels only. IF "Auto" detects slippage, it may engage 4 wheel lock, in tandem with Traction Control and ESP. Then 4 wheel engine braking might occur. It is circumstance-specific, I believe.
 
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