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Hi, so just a little back ground. I currently drive a 07 chevy cobalt to work every day. It's at a little over 305k right now. This is strictly a car for driving to work. I drive about 120 miles a day back and forth to work 5-6 days a week. I'm married and have a 7 and 3 yr old. I hunt and fish as much as possible when I have the free time. My wife has a 16 Mazda CX-5 and she has dumb rules about not putting dead animals in the back of her car.


So there is the background info. I have looked at the Compass as well and really can't make up my mind. I need something with 4wd as a lot of the places I hunt and fish require me to either borrow one of my dads old trucks or hoof it back a long ways. Would love a truck but the gas mileage just isn't going to cut it. Also the price tag on a truck doesn't help either. Does a trailer hitch come stock on the TH model? Would need one for hauling deer.

Hows the back seat for car seats? The 3yr old is still in one and the 7yr is in a booster.

Do you folks think a Renegade would fit my needs?
 

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I drive about the same distance. I get about 26MPG with the 2.4l. I like the renegade a lot, but the cargo are is fairly narrow. I am not sure if that would be good for you. The vehicle drives and handles well but is a bit noisy at higher speeds if that is something that would bother you.

Overall, I love the Renegade as a commuter car because it is low priced (I bought Latitude), decent on gas, seats are comfortable and it handles all weather.

I have no children, so I have no idea about the car seats. Also, I have a Ram truck so I use that if transporting anything large.
 

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I get about the same gas mileage as Joe 2171 and agree with his other statements. The car is really fun to drive and having had a '96 Jeep Cherokee 4X4 and a full size van I am not bothered by my car's noise.Have a 4X2 Lat stock and it goes almost everywhere though now I wish I had 4X4 so I could go even more places.
 

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I have a 2016 Renegade 75th Anniversary Edition (basically a nicely tarted up Latitude) and a 2018 Compass Limited. Both are 4WD. I also carry a variety of "stuff and cargo" in each, but few dead animals. And, I have to buckle in car seats and boosters for the grandkids. With that as a background and considering your needs, I'd recommend you focus on the Compass, because:


- Compass has a lot more rear seat room, especially when it comes to buckling in car seats
- Compass cargo area is substantially better than Renegade
- Fuel economy is basically a toss-up between the Compass and Renegade with the 2.4L engine and 9-speed automatic transmission

- 4WD capability between Renegade and Compass is also pretty much a toss-up. The Traihawk version of either has a few technical nuances/improvements and effective underbody protection. When it comes to off-road protection, non-Trailhawk models are pretty naked underneath. So your 4WD choice is really between Trailhawk and non-Trailhawk versions of either model

- In the current market, incentives for the Compass are often equal to, or better than, those on Renegade. You may well be able to strike a better deal on a Compass. By many measures, this means more vehicle for the same or less money

- There is also a much greater inventory of Compass models on the ground. You're more likely to find what you want


As to a trailer hitch, none of the Renegade or Compass models are equipped with a trailer hitch as standard equipment. If you want to get a Renegade or Compass with the optional trailer hitch factory-installed, you'll probably have better luck finding one among the much greater inventory of Compass models. Of course, there are also aftermarket hitch solutions of greater or lesser cost, quality and integration. In that matter, you pays your money and makes your choice.


Good luck. Both are a pleasure to drive and own (for me, and so far). I'd recommend either but, for the circumstances you describe, the Compass seems like the better fit.
 

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I think you'll do well with the Renegade. However, it's not "4x4" (despite Jeeps clever mismarketing), it's AWD (it uses the GKN Twinster system). It's the same system as in the Fiat 500x (sorry guys but Jeep is the ONLY one who calls this system a "4x4", everyone else (including RR Evoke and GKN themselves) refer to it as AWD). It DOES work well for it's purpose (90% street/ 10% off road) and is one of the best AWD systems out there. But just don't expect it to behave/perform like a real "4x4" and you'll be fine.
Actually, AWD is superior on road (as it moves power to where it senses it needs it, and on road means there is a hard surface underneath). For real "off road", a dedicated "4x4" (defined by "50/50 power distribution front/rear via a locking center coupler. And before someone says, "well the TH has a lock button", understand that the lock button does nothing more than lock the front and rear driveshaft together... that power is then DISENGAGED at the rear axle due to the Twinster's dual clutch rear end. In other words.. nothing you press will send power to the rear wheels. That is controlled via computer software when it senses slippage at the front) is what is needed (since you don't want "power moving", you want consistent power output front/rear to keep moving). True "4x4" gets squirrely on the road, however, in bad weather (as it does not adapt, it's constant).
I've had true "4x4's", and AWD cars. I LOVE the Renegade for my purposes, as it's exactly what I wanted (a beefed up AWD car that has decent ground clearance, is small and nimble, yet gets decent MPG).
 

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I'll add to my comment above. Many do not understand how Jeeps AWD (GKN Twinster) system works. I'll give you a generalized cliff notes. It uses (basically) three points of contact (clutches). Center (rear driveshaft), and two rear axle (one for either side rear wheel).
In normal ("auto") mode it runs via front wheel drive. If it senses power loss at the front tires, it will engage the rear coupler (clutch) to send power to the rear. It will also engage either of the rear couplers (clutches) in the rear axle to send power to either rear wheel it thinks it needs it.
In any of the "modes" which "lock" the (so called) "4x4" system: it engages the rear coupler (sending power down the rear driveshaft) but leaves the rear axle completely OPEN (no power to rear wheels) until it senses slip at the front wheels, at which point it will engage one (or both) of the rear couplers/clutches to power either (or both) of the rear wheels.
So you may say, "what is the point of "lock" if it doesn't move power to the rear?". The answer is: (supposedly) to decrease lag time of the system locking up/moving power (keep in mind, GKN states this is done is 300 milliseconds). The real reason?: so Jeep can claim it's "4x4" (since most define "4x4" as locking power front/rear 50/50). However, they leave out the part that the rear driveshaft is disengaged from the rear axle via their system (clutches), therefore... no power to the rear wheels until the software tells it lock either of the rear clutches. It's a little more complicated than that (there are other instances where the rear wheels are engaged, such as from a standstill), but that's the basic concept.
Don't get me wrong... it's a darn good system and Jeep's AWD is probably the most aggressive of the them out there. But I draw the line at them referring to it as "4x4". IMHO, the fake placebo "lock" button's only purpose is so Jeep can "technically" call this a "4x4", even though it does not operate that way (it IS an AWD system). GREAT vehicle regardless! I LOVE mine! :)
 

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I'll add to my comment above. Many do not understand how Jeeps AWD (GKN Twinster) system works. I'll give you a generalized cliff notes. It uses (basically) three points of contact (clutches). Center (rear driveshaft), and two rear axle (one for either side rear wheel).
In normal ("auto") mode it runs via front wheel drive. If it senses power loss at the front tires, it will engage the rear coupler (clutch) to send power to the rear. It will also engage either of the rear couplers (clutches) in the rear axle to send power to either rear wheel it thinks it needs it.
In any of the "modes" which "lock" the (so called) "4x4" system: it engages the rear coupler (sending power down the rear driveshaft) but leaves the rear axle completely OPEN (no power to rear wheels) until it senses slip at the front wheels, at which point it will engage one (or both) of the rear couplers/clutches to power either (or both) of the rear wheels.
So you may say, "what is the point of "lock" if it doesn't move power to the rear?". The answer is: (supposedly) to decrease lag time of the system locking up/moving power (keep in mind, GKN states this is done is 300 milliseconds). The real reason?: so Jeep can claim it's "4x4" (since most define "4x4" as locking power front/rear 50/50). However, they leave out the part that the rear driveshaft is disengaged from the rear axle via their system (clutches), therefore... no power to the rear wheels until the software tells it lock either of the rear clutches. It's a little more complicated than that (there are other instances where the rear wheels are engaged, such as from a standstill), but that's the basic concept.
Don't get me wrong... it's a darn good system and Jeep's AWD is probably the most aggressive of the them out there. But I draw the line at them referring to it as "4x4". IMHO, the fake placebo "lock" button's only purpose is so Jeep can "technically" call this a "4x4", even though it does not operate that way (it IS an AWD system). GREAT vehicle regardless! I LOVE mine! :)
so by what ur saying, a TH, a nromal 4x4 renegade and a fiat 500x awd can all perform the same and the only difference would be the ground clearance?
 

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Thanks for the explanation - just bought a renegade latitude "4x4" last week, and have been looking for a good guide on its 4x4 capabilities
 

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In a pair of posts above, a list member erroneously states that the Jeep Renegade 4WD system is the GKN Twinster system. This is not correct. As a result, much of the explanation provided in these posts simply does not apply to the Renegade system. What the author has written about the Twinster system may be true for vehicles that actually use the this system (Range Rover Evoque, Ford Focus RS among others). However, it is not correct as a description of the Renegade 4WD system.


The Renegade 4WD system is a GKN system. It is one that GKN describes as their Driveline Disconnect AWD system. For a look at that technology you may want to refer to the following explanation provided by GKN. The embedded video should help visualize what happens when the system engages and disconnects.



http://www.gkndriveline.com/en/solutions-services/case-studies/2016/one-awd-platform-two-distinct-driving-experiences/


Do not misunderstand the fact that the text at the end of the article above mentions GKN Twinster technology. It does so only in describing Twinster as an available (not on Renegade) torque vectoring technology that goes beyond the torque-vectoring capability that the system on the Renegade provides. The fundamental difference is that the Renegade system has the capability to vary (bias) the powetrain's torque distribution front-to-rear when 4WD is engaged. Twinster technology, which the Renegade does not use, has two clutch packs integrated in the Final Drive Unit. These can selectively distribute drivetrain torque between the rear wheels without the wasted power, heat buildup and inefficiency of using brake torque to make a similar, but far more limited, type of torque distribution.


You may also find the following videos useful if you're looking for more "how to use" guidance on Renegade models' Active Drive System (non-Trailhawk models) and Active Drive Low System (Trailhawk model):



https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=194&v=T7F6xfcoFwQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=277&v=WHYIDliUxFQ



As a note on terminology, there is no "official" dictionary or thesaurus that provides precise and industry-wide accepted definitions of terms such as 4x4, AWD, or 4WD. None of these terms are trademarked, none are proprietary. Different companies use the terms as they see fit for purposes that suit their branding and marketing. There are some generalized categories into which one type of system or another may fall. However, if you get hung up on things like defining 4x4 as only a system with locking power front/rear 50/50, then you'll be both wrong and missing the bigger point. The bigger point is that the development of systems capable of driving all four wheels is always a mix of considerations that include the specific vehicle, its customer expectations, competitive considerations, price points, and much more. What we should celebrate is that Jeep offers an outstanding range of vehicles that include 4x4 systems designed to most appropriately complement the individual model.
 

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so by what ur saying, a TH, a nromal 4x4 renegade and a fiat 500x awd can all perform the same and the only difference would be the ground clearance?
No, there is more difference than that. They both use the same GKN Twinster AWD system, but the 500x and Renegade TH are calibrated differently (this system is completely computer controlled). The Renegade TH system IS calibrated more "aggressively" (computer software tells it to engage more than 500x software would), but realistically... they are similar.
Also, there is so such animal as a "4x4" Renegade. They are ALL AWD (there is a distinct difference between 4x4 and AWD which manufacturers like Jeep would love to muddy, but there ARE differences which are important if you need a certain vehicle behavior off road). Notice how no other manufacturer labels their AWD system as 4x4. Ford Explorer (torque vectoring AWD) is AWD, Subaru (also torque vectoring) is AWD, Even Toyota Highlander... AWD.
Fiat 500x (GKN Twinster AWD).. AWD.
Jeep Renegade TH (GKN Twinster AWD) somehow labeled "4x4" (for the reasons I listed above).
Jeep DOES make the most capable (real) 4x4 system in existence (the Wrangler Rubicon part time 4x4 system with elock diffs). I just find it disturbing that they try to fool everyone into thinking ALL Jeeps share the same (or even remotely) capability with false advertising/labeling.
The Renegade TH (and even non TH) has an EXCELLENT AWD system (very aggressive) and is far better than anything in it's class (which is why I love mine!), but they need to stop mislabeling it as "4x4" (which they do, on purpose, to trick people into thinking it's a wrangler type 4x4 system).

So.. IMHO.. it's a VERY good AWD vehicle (thus why I love mine), but realistically... it's never going to be an offroad based 4x4 type vehicle.
 

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In a pair of posts above, a list member erroneously states that the Jeep Renegade 4WD system is the GKN Twinster system. This is not correct. As a result, much of the explanation provided in these posts simply does not apply to the Renegade system. What the author has written about the Twinster system may be true for vehicles that actually use the this system (Range Rover Evoque, Ford Focus RS among others). However, it is not correct as a description of the Renegade 4WD system.


The Renegade 4WD system is a GKN system. It is one that GKN describes as their Driveline Disconnect AWD system. For a look at that technology you may want to refer to the following explanation provided by GKN. The embedded video should help visualize what happens when the system engages and disconnects.



http://www.gkndriveline.com/en/solutions-services/case-studies/2016/one-awd-platform-two-distinct-driving-experiences/


Do not misunderstand the fact that the text at the end of the article above mentions GKN Twinster technology. It does so only in describing Twinster as an available (not on Renegade) torque vectoring technology that goes beyond the torque-vectoring capability that the system on the Renegade provides. The fundamental difference is that the Renegade system has the capability to vary (bias) the powetrain's torque distribution front-to-rear when 4WD is engaged. Twinster technology, which the Renegade does not use, has two clutch packs integrated in the Final Drive Unit. These can selectively distribute drivetrain torque between the rear wheels without the wasted power, heat buildup and inefficiency of using brake torque to make a similar, but far more limited, type of torque distribution.


You may also find the following videos useful if you're looking for more "how to use" guidance on Renegade models' Active Drive System (non-Trailhawk models) and Active Drive Low System (Trailhawk model):



https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=194&v=T7F6xfcoFwQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=277&v=WHYIDliUxFQ



As a note on terminology, there is no "official" dictionary or thesaurus that provides precise and industry-wide accepted definitions of terms such as 4x4, AWD, or 4WD. None of these terms are trademarked, none are proprietary. Different companies use the terms as they see fit for purposes that suit their branding and marketing. There are some generalized categories into which one type of system or another may fall. However, if you get hung up on things like defining 4x4 as only a system with locking power front/rear 50/50, then you'll be both wrong and missing the bigger point. The bigger point is that the development of systems capable of driving all four wheels is always a mix of considerations that include the specific vehicle, its customer expectations, competitive considerations, price points, and much more. What we should celebrate is that Jeep offers an outstanding range of vehicles that include 4x4 systems designed to most appropriately complement the individual model.
I will respectfully disagree. There IS a definition of AWD vs 4x4 and if you google it, it becomes quite apparent what the accepted difference is. Manufacturers may try to "merger/muddy" the definition, but that doesn't mean it isn't there (and it IS).
Also, as for the GKN Twinster system. GKN's own site used to have a page up that SPECIFIED the Renegade as SPECIFICALLY using their "Twinster" set up (thus where I got my information). I had posted this (and GKN link specifying such) quite a few times, and since then Jeep erased that forum thread, and now that GKN page is gone. Welcome to Jeep's information blackout.
Jeep is VERY protective of it's "4x4" claim, and has a history of eradicating any evidence (or links) dispelling that mistruth. Heck, this entire thread will be gone soon as well.
GKN has clearly stated that the Jeep Renegade uses their Twinster set up, and they also make a similar set up for the RR Evoke (but claim the Renegades setup, and they didn't specify TH or not, is their most sophisticated set up to date).
So, none of this will matter, as somehow this entire information will disappear as it has in the past (as I've posted it numerous times, and it always does).

ETA: this is from Edmunds... the least tech out there:
https://www.edmunds.com/car-buying/awd-vs-4wd-whats-the-difference-and-which-to-choose.html
And by THAT definition.. the Renegade is a "part time AWD"
 

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Well, we live at the end of an unmaintained county road in the Ozarks of MO. Every day ours is driven, it has at least some "Off road" driving that often requires 4WD or AWD. We've been very pleased with our Trailhawk. We get 26-31mpg (We got 31+ mpg all over the mountains in Colorado on vacation last summer).

When we bought ours, there was one Trailhawk with the trailer hitch parked right next to it. But my wife couldn't warm up to the Granite color. Had it been black, especially a "Flat" black, we would have bought that. I would try to get a hitch on one next time if we would buy another. That said, if you don't want to mess with wiring, you could get the hitch installed relatively inexpensively. I think we're going to do that for one of those hitch-mounted cargo carriers. I think that a larger one would be fine to haul most deer except maybe a huge whitetail or Muley?

Anyway, I have a Silverado and find myself finding excuses to drive the wife's Trailhawk all the time. And because it's lighter on it's feet, it gets around places I wouldn't/couldn't take my 4WD Silverado. Love ours!
 

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You may also find the following videos useful if you're looking for more "how to use" guidance on Renegade models' Active Drive System (non-Trailhawk models) and Active Drive Low System (Trailhawk model):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=194&v=T7F6xfcoFwQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=277&v=WHYIDliUxFQ
After watching these (and some other) videos, I'm not clear on the difference between "Sand" and "Mud"; the descriptions were the same.
 

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After watching these (and some other) videos, I'm not clear on the difference between "Sand" and "Mud"; the descriptions were the same.
From what I have read the modes change the power bias between the front and rear wheels as well adjust throttle response and traction control. The videos don't go into much detail.

Sand mode - aggressive throttle, holds gears longer and has a 40 front and 60 rear power bias. Traction control is off.
Mud mode - aggressive throttle, holds gears longer and has a 50 front and 50 rear power bias. Traction control is off.
Snow mode - reduced throttle, reduced steering input, starts in 2nd gear for automatics and has a 60 front and 40 rear power bias. Traction control is on but reduced.
 

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Ignore advertised fuel economy IMO, and use fuelly to get real world results for vehicles you are interested in: http://www.fuelly.com/

There's also a great tool called "Edmunds Car Finder". They hide it in their website, so its almost impossible to find now, but this is the direct link: https://www.edmunds.com/finder/car-finder-results.html

You can check off the options you want on the left, and then narrow down to the vehicles that match and then go test drive them all.

If you decide on a Renegade, I would wait until the 2019s start showing up on dealer lots.

1) You might prefer the refreshed 2019 better, and on the Trailhawk specifically you might like the new 1.3T better than the old 2.4 Tigershark.
2) If you do prefer the old ones, its likely that when new ones are on dealer lots, 2018s are going to drop in price like a rock and you can get a great deal on a leftover.
 
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