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http://wardsauto.com/auto-makers/jeep-sets-big-plans-smallest-model

Jeep is counting on its smallest vehicle to do some heavy lifting.

“We want the 2015 Renegade to attract a new generation of Jeep owners,” Becky Blanchard, Jeep brand manager, says at a recent preview of the all-new compact SUV for the Midwest Automotive Media Assn.

“We’re looking for young as well as older buyers on a fixed budget, but the core buyer we’re looking to attract is the first-time buyer who will start with our smallest, lowest-priced model and stay in the family as he works his way up through the Jeep lineup over time,” Blanchard says.

The new faces Jeep hopes to win over when Renegade goes on sale at the end of this year are those who normally would buy a small car, especially a hatchback, she says.

“Renegade offers the room and utility of a hatchback car, and with the added security of 4-wheel drive, you can escape the city when looking for adventure,” Blanchard adds.

Rivals will be the Nissan Juke, Buick Encore and the upcoming Chevy Trax that will bow for ’15, as well as the Kia Soul, though “Soul doesn't offer 4WD like Renegade does,” she notes. This segment should account for annual sales of about 2 million units worldwide, about 500,000 of those in the U.S. Jeep does not disclose production or sales targets.

The larger midsize Honda CR-V, Ford Escape and Toyota RAV4 don't compete with Renegade, Blanchard says.
 

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Of course they are. See what the automakers dont want us to know is that they benefit FAR more if consumers are buying new light trucks instead of new passenger vehicles. CAFE ratings for the entire company takes into account percentage of sales from X vehicle and then uses that percentage to calculate X vehicles effect on total company CAFE rating.

Light trucks have less stringent regulation, its a small loophole in the regulations that has lead to CUV everything.
 

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They'll also compete with the Honda HR-V and the eventual Mazda CX-3. Depending on the AWD system, if any that will go into the HR-V, I think that may turn out to be the biggest competitor for the Renegade for the "new" clients they're looking for.
 

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They'll also compete with the Honda HR-V and the eventual Mazda CX-3. Depending on the AWD system, if any that will go into the HR-V, I think that may turn out to be the biggest competitor for the Renegade for the "new" clients they're looking for.
I think HR-V is poised to be the volume leader in segment. Juke could never do it because of its face, KIA is KIA, Jeeps are never volume leaders, the TRAX doesnt exist yet (even so Equinox has never challenged for top spot) and Toyota and Ford do not participate...

will be interesting indeed...
 

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Of course they are. See what the automakers dont want us to know is that they benefit FAR more if consumers are buying new light trucks instead of new passenger vehicles. CAFE ratings for the entire company takes into account percentage of sales from X vehicle and then uses that percentage to calculate X vehicles effect on total company CAFE rating.

Light trucks have less stringent regulation, its a small loophole in the regulations that has lead to CUV everything.

I thought the light truck advantage went away to updates ago for cafe. Now you get a break based on some wheelbase and track formula. I.e. Bigger cars get more of a break.

Hence things like the renegade that take a fuel efficient platform and push the wheels out. And the new 200 which gets stretched before getting the v6.
 

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I thought the light truck advantage went away to updates ago for cafe. Now you get a break based on some wheelbase and track formula. I.e. Bigger cars get more of a break.

Hence things like the renegade that take a fuel efficient platform and push the wheels out. And the new 200 which gets stretched before getting the v6.
ITs been tightened up, but not closed completely...

http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/20...s-different-fascia-to-qualify-as-light-truck/

To recap quickly, CAFE splits vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating (GWVR) under 8,500 lbs into two categories: cars and light trucks. Each vehicle has a “footprint” formula based on the vehicle size, with fuel economy targets it must meet. These are added up to a “fleet average” for each manufacturer, and there are a whole host of byzantine rules regarding “credits” for different technologies, like start-stop systems, hybrids and EVs that can be applied. They key concept here is that two vehicles can be the same “footprint”, but the “light truck” has to meet a fuel economy standard that is less stringent than the “car” standard. This (along with market forces) has been one reason why crossovers have become such a prominent segment in the American auto market.
 

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Looking into it, apparently light trucks still get the dual ranking for imports vs. domestic production. Light trucks also get about a 25% break in CO2 emissions over passenger cars. There's a small break for light trucks in economy, but most of that is allowing the minimum standard to be lower due to cutting off the footprint curve at a MUCH larger footprint. (something like 67 sqft vs 57 sqft). If your truck is big enough, it can get about 26-27mpg and meet CAFE requirements.

Sincce we don't know the track for the renegade, I'm borrowing the soul as a guide. Soul has a 70.9" width and a 62.2" track when wearing the same size tires as the renegade. renegade is 71.0" width, so lets call it 62.3" track.

That makes it's CAFE footprint. 43.78 sqft. Looking at the charts, which aren't labeled finely enough to be exact, that looks to be about 35 mpg if it is tagged as a light truck and what looks like about 37mpg if classed as a passenger car. Small trucks are not advantaged heavily. CO2 wise, as a passenger car, it is permitted what looks to be about 210 g/mi, and if a truck, it gets to have about 250 g/mi of CO2 output. That's a much more significant difference, and likely what manufacturers care about rather than the ~2MPG delta for any given footprint.
 

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Looking into it, apparently light trucks still get the dual ranking for imports vs. domestic production. Light trucks also get about a 25% break in CO2 emissions over passenger cars. There's a small break for light trucks in economy, but most of that is allowing the minimum standard to be lower due to cutting off the footprint curve at a MUCH larger footprint. (something like 67 sqft vs 57 sqft). If your truck is big enough, it can get about 26-27mpg and meet CAFE requirements.

Sincce we don't know the track for the renegade, I'm borrowing the soul as a guide. Soul has a 70.9" width and a 62.2" track when wearing the same size tires as the renegade. renegade is 71.0" width, so lets call it 62.3" track.

That makes it's CAFE footprint. 43.78 sqft. Looking at the charts, which aren't labeled finely enough to be exact, that looks to be about 35 mpg if it is tagged as a light truck and what looks like about 37mpg if classed as a passenger car. Small trucks are not advantaged heavily. CO2 wise, as a passenger car, it is permitted what looks to be about 210 g/mi, and if a truck, it gets to have about 250 g/mi of CO2 output. That's a much more significant difference, and likely what manufacturers care about rather than the ~2MPG delta for any given footprint.
As to the track question I may have an answer for you

http://www.allpar.com/SUVs/jeep/renegade.html

The body is based on an updated version of Fiat’s SCSS small car platform (dimensions), with a new “small-wide 4x4 architecture” — a modular suspension system that allows vehicles with the same core dimensions to share suspensions and powertrain components. To work, the wheelbase, track, front overhang, length, and width have to be the same.
http://www.allpar.com/SUVs/jeep/specifications/renegade-development.html

A two-year delay acknowledged in the Chrysler five year plan update supports this theory; the delay is explained if the original plan was to use a lightly modified Fiat, but Jeep (in the person of Mike Manley) demanded increased capabilities. It shares Fiat’s SCSS hard-point dimensions, will have a unique suspension architecture and presumably stronger body construction.
http://articles.sae.org/12880/

Riding on a 101.2-in (2570-mm) wheelbase, with 60.6-in (1540-mm) front and rear tracks, the Renegade is a key product in Fiat Chrysler’s strategy to fully globalize the Jeep brand. The “baby Jeep” will be sold in more than 100 global markets with one of the industry’s most comprehensive powertrain offerings.
 
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