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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I had not read much in this forum about the traction control button and function.

So upon farting around with the system in my 1.4L Latitude manual 4x4, I discovered the button has a secondary function. So it goes as such if you press it once it turns off the traction control. pretty straight forward. But did you folks know that if you hold the button down for say 7 to 8 seconds, it not only turns off the traction control, but you can also disable the Electronic Skid Control (ESC).

I saw somewhere last week some body saying even with the traction control off their Rene still wanted to nanny their driving. Well once both are off kiss your nannies good bye. ABS remains but now the truck is more spry for shenanigans >:D Took her out into a dirt parking lot and on auto mode got the Rene all types of sideways.

So got me thinking this is not only sweet for fudging around, but in real off-road situations where these nanny systems have given people headaches on going up hills and weird terrain. This is a way to stop them with out removing the fuse.

Finally , I can't for 100% say all the protection stuff is disabled b/c well, I didn't go to crazy being the truck has less than 500 miles on it, but buddy did it make it more fun in the dirt.:D
 

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I always turn off traction control and ESC in both my vehicles. It can be annoying in slippery conditions (like snow) if you know how to control a sliding vehicle. It works well for people who don't notice the vehicle when it first starts to "get away" from them and can save their bacon.

The problem with "ESC on" is that once the vehicle starts to kick out, I will countersteer immediately. The ESC will cause my countersteer to over-correct a little. I will compensate of course, but the feeling is quite annoying and can be prevented with ESC set to off.

YMMV depending on your skill level.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've googled, (as we all do) and can only find instructions for OTHER Jeep models, all with automatic transmission. Perhaps there IS a way to disable this function during good driving weather?
Here is my thoughts on the overall software architecture. The FCA controls are very similar to what I had in my VWs and later model Mini coopers. Basically FCA can connect through ODB, and then w/ proper software for example VW uses VAG-com, you can go in and change your system parameters.

So stuff like Traction control and ECS, the temperature of your heated seats, auto window down w/ the remote, turn signal flasher count, seat belt chimes, and tons of other goodies.

The folks at the dealer can change all of these, but dealers tend to go with what the lawyers say and won't make these changes for you. Just like how our remotes had the trunk button disabled.

If you friend up a tech it is no biggy and they can bust it out in 30 minutes. What we need is one of the Fiat, Dart geeks to figure out the software programming and get us a version of VAG-COM for our FCA cars. From there we just need a compatible ODB dongle and laptop.

I really want to get into my cars software system, I know I can make tweeks that will make the car a overall better driver.
 

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I believe it goes into more detail in the owner's manual but I'm pretty sure the anti-roll part of the ECS is still on in the background, even when it's "off".

I know when I was drifting my Jeep around in the snow, the brakes were stinky so that leads me to believe it's using the brakes to an extent for the torque vectoring to each wheel.

Keep in mind that when you start taking nannies off of vehicles with high centers of gravity, you must be extra careful. I ran my smart car without the fuse in for the nannies and guess what? After about 7 months I rolled it and totalled it. And I had taken that thing everywhere. It did things it shouldn't have been able to do (keep up with Civic Si and BMW E30 on back roads in Georgia).

The ultimate downfall for the smart was a left-right transition that was executed too quickly and caused the roll. It happened so fast because of the wheelbase it was impossible to correct in time.

On the back roads here in Southern Ohio, I can hit curves at the same speeds I did in my Fiat Abarth in the Jeep...... but those tight chicanes have to be slower, the vehicle just isn't made for that quick of a transition :)

I don't know if this video is public or not but this was last weekend. Gotta be smooth in the Jeep lol! But it really doesn't have too much body roll, which is good!

https://www.facebook.com/brandon.geis/videos/10153841803899823/ (make sure to hit HD)
 

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Well, aside from being more "peppy" with this switch in the "both off" position, my first impression is better long trip mileage in good weather. Around 225 miles or so today, most of it interstate at 65-70 mph (yes, I am not a speeder) and the overall miles per gallon is 31 on my latitude stickshift. Standard fuel, not mid or high. Usually upper 20's. Could be the switch being off, could be warmer weather and a happier engine, either way, that's today's fact. Happy to report.

ONLY thing I found today was the recurring of the red lights on the 9-1-1 console, and...heavy bumps that disengage the cruise. I hope there's an adjustment for cruise sensitivity. Will ask dealer soon.

Cheers!
 

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Given that these vehicles use the brakes to control wheelspin when four-wheeling, how does disabling this system affect offroad performance where traction is the goal? I'm curious to know if one just gets wheelspin without forward motion when disabling the traction control.

Don't get me wrong, it's a blast to hoon it up- that cinder-dune where the Apollo astronauts trained up near Flagstaff, Arizona is a lot of fun to slide-around in- but it sounds like the applications for disabling the system are somewhat limited given how the drivetrain was designed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What I have run into with these systems is that in certain slow moving situations these systems hinder the goal at hand. My wifes VW Tiguan couldnt get up a semi steep hill that was really icey bc the TC system kept applying brakes when all that was needed was consistent power to over come. Turn the tc off no longer an issue. Especially those with a automatic. My manual just becomes more gnar in wet conditions. Rad.
 

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This weekend I took a freeway trip to a jobsite - about 42 miles each way. First trip I fueled up, hit the freeway, and once I was upto speed I reset the mileage computer and got about 20 MPG when I hit the off-ramp at the jobsite. On the trip back, I did the same thing - hit the freeway, got upto speed, reset the mileage computer, but then I also turned off the Traction Control and I got 27 MPG when I hit the exit ramp near home. This is kinda distressing that such a wide margin exists without the traction control. Anyone else notice this? My Renegade is a 2015 2.4l 4x4 9-Speed Auto - no modifications other than a roofrack. I did not use cruise control, just tried to maintain a constant speed of about 65-70 and there were no incidences of braking or hard acceleration, just a smooth ride each way. My Jeep has 13,000 miles and has been in for the 10K-mile software updates and oil changes, everything is running fine.
 

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I have noticed this too. In the morning I go to work and I register 29 mpg (2016 Renegade Trailhawk) and on the return trip home (doing the same route, just in reverse) I average 20 mpg according to the readout. I thought I was just driving differently as the afternoon is rush hour and longer jammups at lights, but now you got me wondering. Also, this morning as I went around a left hand turn that went onto a main road from a secondary road, a slight crown to the road so the Jeep was off kilter a few degrees, but it was solid dry pavement, as I go to accelerate the traction control light comes on and I am held at 10 mph for about 3-5 seconds, all while some dude is tailgating me with his high beams like I am some idiot. I have to go check to see if I even have a traction control on/off switch. At the moment, I don't think so.
 

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I may test this. Have you considered that the difference in MPG could be attributed to grade? For example, I get much better mileage coming home from the I.E. here in SoCal than I do heading inland in the morning, but that's because the entire route inland is a very gradual uphill drive over 50 miles or so. To further compound that aspect, the car is pretty heavy for the size of it's engine. Something to think about.

I'm going to test MPG round trip with traction control off and see what I get!
 

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I always turn off traction control and ESC in both my vehicles. It can be annoying in slippery conditions (like snow) if you know how to control a sliding vehicle. It works well for people who don't notice the vehicle when it first starts to "get away" from them and can save their bacon.

The problem with "ESC on" is that once the vehicle starts to kick out, I will countersteer immediately. The ESC will cause my countersteer to over-correct a little. I will compensate of course, but the feeling is quite annoying and can be prevented with ESC set to off.

YMMV depending on your skill level.
Hmm. I've been driving snow-covered mountain highways for decades (for work) in FWD, RWD, and full-time 4WD vehicles, and I have yet to have a front wheel drive vehicle like the Renegade "kick out" on me. It happens lots with RWD vehicles, and yes immediate countersteer is the reflex action, but with FWD it's more common for the vehicle to understeer, in my experience.

That said, I've found the electronic stability system on my current SUV--which has full-time 4WD--is very good, and I like having it. As my Renegade is ten years newer, I'm hoping its ESC will be even better.
 

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Hmm. I've been driving snow-covered mountain highways for decades (for work) in FWD, RWD, and full-time 4WD vehicles, and I have yet to have a front wheel drive vehicle like the Renegade "kick out" on me. It happens lots with RWD vehicles, and yes immediate countersteer is the reflex action, but with FWD it's more common for the vehicle to understeer, in my experience.

That said, I've found the electronic stability system on my current SUV--which has full-time 4WD--is very good, and I like having it. As my Renegade is ten years newer, I'm hoping its ESC will be even better.
The "kick out" comment was meant for cars like my Challenger with its rear wheel drive and limited slip differential.

But I don't like the ESC intervention on FWD or AWD vehicles either. Sometimes revving up and spinning will prevent you from getting stuck which the ESC tends to mitigate.

Like I wrote earlier, YMMV.
 

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I believe it goes into more detail in the owner's manual but I'm pretty sure the anti-roll part of the ECS is still on in the background, even when it's "off".

I know when I was drifting my Jeep around in the snow, the brakes were stinky so that leads me to believe it's using the brakes to an extent for the torque vectoring to each wheel.

Keep in mind that when you start taking nannies off of vehicles with high centers of gravity, you must be extra careful. I ran my smart car without the fuse in for the nannies and guess what? After about 7 months I rolled it and totalled it. And I had taken that thing everywhere. It did things it shouldn't have been able to do (keep up with Civic Si and BMW E30 on back roads in Georgia).

The ultimate downfall for the smart was a left-right transition that was executed too quickly and caused the roll. It happened so fast because of the wheelbase it was impossible to correct in time.

On the back roads here in Southern Ohio, I can hit curves at the same speeds I did in my Fiat Abarth in the Jeep...... but those tight chicanes have to be slower, the vehicle just isn't made for that quick of a transition :)

I don't know if this video is public or not but this was last weekend. Gotta be smooth in the Jeep lol! But it really doesn't have too much body roll, which is good!

https://www.facebook.com/brandon.geis/videos/10153841803899823/ (make sure to hit HD)
What's up with the chick music in the background, Mr. Geis?
 
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