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When I was researching the Renegade I could have sworn I read that the MPG was going to be in the 30-35 range. The stickers I saw yesterday were all 4x4 models with 24-29 avg rating. Can anyone confirm mileage yet? I was really hoping for better gas performance.
 

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I get about 22-23 in mostly city driving with a fair ammount of stop and go. Did a 1hr trip both ways that bumped that up to 25. I just hit 1000 miles yesterday.

So far, it's about what it was reported to be.
 

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I just got my Latitude Renegade 4x3 on Saturday. I immediately drove from Princeton,NJ to Delaware and PA. Some mix of roads, but I'd obviously say mostly highway. I got 30.3MPG average.

Closer to home, and running errands, I got around 28. I'm not an old man, but I am very easy on the gas from standstill. I'm used to driving around my 4 speed Silverado with a big engine and noTCS, so a careful foot is required.

Drive a little gentle, and you'll see 30. I don't want to put too much strain on the transmission as I'm already paranoid about the 9HP tranny (had problems with it in the Evoque).

-Avi
 

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I just got my Latitude Renegade 4x3 on Saturday. I immediately drove from Princeton,NJ to Delaware and PA. Some mix of roads, but I'd obviously say mostly highway. I got 30.3MPG average.

Closer to home, and running errands, I got around 28. I'm not an old man, but I am very easy on the gas from standstill. I'm used to driving around my 4 speed Silverado with a big engine and noTCS, so a careful foot is required.

Drive a little gentle, and you'll see 30. I don't want to put too much strain on the transmission as I'm already paranoid about the 9HP tranny (had problems with it in the Evoque).

-Avi
That's not too bad at all.
Too bad it's going to take some time till your engine develops consistency with how it performs as it has to go through the break in process engines need.
 

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Tony,

Agreed. However, I'm optimistic as breaking the engine in usually yieldsslightly better MPG as the friction within the cylinder walls/rings and other surfaces decreases. With that aside, I have seen some of my older BMWs learn some
"interesting" throttle position logic that would need to be reset so I could have the mechanical granularity to be a little less rude to the throttle :-D

-A
 

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I have a FWD Latitude with 9 speed automatic (2.4 engine). Vehicle has just under 1,000 miles on it. First two manual mpg calcs with 65/35 city/hwy came in right at 27 mpg. Just took a 250 mile trip on the highway and got 31.5 mpg. I live in an area with reformulated gas so these figures have me very happy at this point.
 

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Tony,

Agreed. However, I'm optimistic as breaking the engine in usually yieldsslightly better MPG as the friction within the cylinder walls/rings and other surfaces decreases. With that aside, I have seen some of my older BMWs learn some
"interesting" throttle position logic that would need to be reset so I could have the mechanical granularity to be a little less rude to the throttle :-D

-A
Yeah usually that's the case, along with having enough pressure built up through random higher revs to seat the piston rings.

Hopefully all goes well!

On another note, reporting these numbers on Fuelly will be a good idea for those that haven't done so already.
 

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Yeah usually that's the case, along with having enough pressure built up through random higher revs to seat the piston rings.

Hopefully all goes well!

On another note, reporting these numbers on Fuelly will be a good idea for those that haven't done so already.
Tony,

I'm so hesitant to give it the full range of RPMs cause I'm so paranoid about the 9HP. My father had the Evoque with this tranny and it was constantly a source of frustration. How have you been breaking in? I need a little encouragement haha >:D

With any of my track toys, I've usually just done the usual heat cycles. So realistically, just like 60-70% of how it'll be ridden/driven, then let it cool. Do that a few times, drain,inspect (record compression), flush, fill...and let her rip :-D

-Avi
 

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Just did a fuel test. For 11.7 gallons of fuel (+/-0.25 gal) I got 18.8 mpg for 92% city driving, 8% highway driving with approx. %2.5 stupid driving in the city (driving over grass, flooring it etc.).
 

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Tony,

I'm so hesitant to give it the full range of RPMs cause I'm so paranoid about the 9HP. My father had the Evoque with this tranny and it was constantly a source of frustration. How have you been breaking in? I need a little encouragement haha >:D

With any of my track toys, I've usually just done the usual heat cycles. So realistically, just like 60-70% of how it'll be ridden/driven, then let it cool. Do that a few times, drain,inspect (record compression), flush, fill...and let her rip :-D

-Avi
Some motivation: In order for a modern engine to break in properly (piston rings seat into the cylinder walls) the cylinder pressure needs to be as high as possible as soon as possible. This should only be done after a proper warm up. (A given for most but just in case)

Revving the engine to redline under load (mat it!) is the best way to create the necessary pressures. Once at redline letting off the throttle and holding the gear to keep the revs up (while coasting) will build sufficient vacuum so that any tiny metal shavings can be sucked out of the cylinders (rather than letting them settle into the oil.)

There is only a small window of time this can be done before the rings wear away the crosshatch edges which seat the rings. If the crosshatch is worn away before the rings are seated, optimum sealing will likely never occur unless you introduce a mild abrasive into the combustion chamber (not fun but it works.)

Doing these things also gives the computer a chance to learn all of its parameters. If the computer does not properly "learn" it can cause all sorts of silly problems though out the life of the vehicle. I have seen many a vehicle which came in with all sorts of problems easily solved by some rough play time to get the computers to learn. (this is a big problem with automatic transmissions cough cough hint hint 9-speed jeep trans)

Hopefully this helps clear up some unknowns. If people follow this, their vehicles will run cleaner and stronger, far longer.

Happy Motoring!
 

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Some motivation: In order for a modern engine to break in properly (piston rings seat into the cylinder walls) the cylinder pressure needs to be as high as possible as soon as possible. This should only be done after a proper warm up. (A given for most but just in case)

Revving the engine to redline under load (mat it!) is the best way to create the necessary pressures. Once at redline letting off the throttle and holding the gear to keep the revs up (while coasting) will build sufficient vacuum so that any tiny metal shavings can be sucked out of the cylinders (rather than letting them settle into the oil.)

There is only a small window of time this can be done before the rings wear away the crosshatch edges which seat the rings. If the crosshatch is worn away before the rings are seated, optimum sealing will likely never occur unless you introduce a mild abrasive into the combustion chamber (not fun but it works.)

Doing these things also gives the computer a chance to learn all of its parameters. If the computer does not properly "learn" it can cause all sorts of silly problems though out the life of the vehicle. I have seen many a vehicle which came in with all sorts of problems easily solved by some rough play time to get the computers to learn. (this is a big problem with automatic transmissions cough cough hint hint 9-speed jeep trans)

Hopefully this helps clear up some unknowns. If people follow this, their vehicles will run cleaner and stronger, far longer.

Happy Motoring!
KS,

Maximizing the vacuum for the sake of getting that crap out of there makes a lot more science, you're right. Thanks man! Will do.
 

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I just filled my Trailhawk today. I went 297.0 miles and it took 10.959 gallons. Worked out to an actual 27.1 mpg and the trip odometer indicated 26.8 mpg.
 

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I wish I knew how you guys were getting such good gas mileage in your trailhawks. I have been averaging 18-20mpg with 60% highway & 40% streets. This is with me trying to accelerate slowly, if I gun it my combined MPG gets even worse.
 

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I wish I knew how you guys were getting such good gas mileage in your trailhawks. I have been averaging 18-20mpg with 60% highway & 40% streets. This is with me trying to accelerate slowly, if I gun it my combined MPG gets even worse.
My tank was probably 75% highway & 25% surface streets. I've kept my highway speed down because I read somewhere that it's not very aerodynamic.
 

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Is the "RTE" accurate? It seems that it fluctuates like crazy and i have never seen that in a vehicle. maybe it settles down after a couple fill ups?

It starts at like 342 and then drops to 280 when on the highway and then back up. I don't think Ive seen the fluctuations in other vehicles I have driven but maybe I didn't pay enough attention as I have it programmed on the Rene screen right in the middle.
 

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Just did a fuel test. For 11.7 gallons of fuel (+/-0.25 gal) I got 18.8 mpg for 92% city driving, 8% highway driving with approx. %2.5 stupid driving in the city (driving over grass, flooring it etc.).
That doesn't make me feel good. My commute is probably 80%+ of my driving and is pathologically bad. I get like 17mpg out of my current awd turbo 4 @250hp/250ft-lsb. I was hoping for more of a break than just moving to regular form premium.
 

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Is the "RTE" accurate? It seems that it fluctuates like crazy and i have never seen that in a vehicle. maybe it settles down after a couple fill ups?

It starts at like 342 and then drops to 280 when on the highway and then back up. I don't think Ive seen the fluctuations in other vehicles I have driven but maybe I didn't pay enough attention as I have it programmed on the Rene screen right in the middle.
If RTE is real time fuel economy, yes it will always fluctuate horribly in every car. It's basically telling you what your MPG is based on the current injector duty cycle and projecting that as the duty cycle for the whole trip. This is the way it has worked on all the cars with such a thing I have seen since the first time I saw it in the late 80s/early 90s.
 
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