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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I'm new to the forum and just registered today. This is a somewhat long post, so please bear with me.....

I'm really excited that the Renegade is coming out soon. I've been looking for a car like this for a long time, and IMO this is the first one like it and does not really have any competition.

Here is what I want in a vehicle:

1) 4WD/AWD - I will never go off road, but as I live in the Northeast, we get quite a bit of snow, and I need to be able to drive through snow. Also, the broken roads around here are terrible, so sometimes driving on a bad road can be like going off road.

2) High seating position - I injured my back a few years ago and can no longer sit comfortably in a regular car for more than a little while. So I need the higher seating position to be comfortable on longer trips

3) I do a ton of highway driving, so it needs to be fuel efficient.

4) I prefer a small car. I'm a single guy with no kids, so I don't really care about the "utility" part of the SUV. I'd take a 2-seater SUV if they made such a thing.


So due to my back injury, about a year and a half ago I decided I can no longer drive a regular car and needed to get a car with a higher seating position. I hate really large cars, so my choices were very limited. In the end I found only 4 cars that fit the bill and I ended up leasing a totally stripped BMW X1. It's a nice car, but a bit plain looking and I wish it was a little higher up. The only other cars I found that were suitable were the Subaru Crosstrek (too slow), the Jeep Patriot (I considered this), and Range Rover Evoque (loved it, but was too expensive for me).

My lease ends next year, so I think I'll most likely be getting a Renegade. What I'm wondering is if there is any advantage to getting a Trailhawk considering I don't go off road. I'd actually much prefer getting a Latitude 4x4 with the 1.4L Turbo and 6-speed manual, and then maybe switch the all season tires out for some more rugged tires like the General Grabber AT2s (yes I checked and they come in 215/65/16 which is the tire size for the base Latitude). I figure that would make it better in snow.

Is there any advantage of the 4WD system on the Trailhawk when you are driving in snow, or does it only give an advantage if you are rock climbing? I do realize the Trailhawk has a few other additions like skid plates and a 0.8 inch lift, but those don't seem like useful things for driving in snow or on rough roads.

What do you think?
 

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Hey all, I'm new to the forum and just registered today. This is a somewhat long post, so please bear with me.....

I'm really excited that the Renegade is coming out soon. I've been looking for a car like this for a long time, and IMO this is the first one like it and does not really have any competition.

Here is what I want in a vehicle:

1) 4WD/AWD - I will never go off road, but as I live in the Northeast, we get quite a bit of snow, and I need to be able to drive through snow. Also, the broken roads around here are terrible, so sometimes driving on a bad road can be like going off road.

2) High seating position - I injured my back a few years ago and can no longer sit comfortably in a regular car for more than a little while. So I need the higher seating position to be comfortable on longer trips

3) I do a ton of highway driving, so it needs to be fuel efficient.

4) I prefer a small car. I'm a single guy with no kids, so I don't really care about the "utility" part of the SUV. I'd take a 2-seater SUV if they made such a thing.


So due to my back injury, about a year and a half ago I decided I can no longer drive a regular car and needed to get a car with a higher seating position. I hate really large cars, so my choices were very limited. In the end I found only 4 cars that fit the bill and I ended up leasing a totally stripped BMW X1. It's a nice car, but a bit plain looking and I wish it was a little higher up. The only other cars I found that were suitable were the Subaru Crosstrek (too slow), the Jeep Patriot (I considered this), and Range Rover Evoque (loved it, but was too expensive for me).

My lease ends next year, so I think I'll most likely be getting a Renegade. What I'm wondering is if there is any advantage to getting a Trailhawk considering I don't go off road. I'd actually much prefer getting a Latitude 4x4 with the 1.4L Turbo and 6-speed manual, and then maybe switch the all season tires out for some more rugged tires like the General Grabber AT2s (yes I checked and they come in 215/65/16 which is the tire size for the base Latitude). I figure that would make it better in snow.

Is there any advantage of the 4WD system on the Trailhawk when you are driving in snow, or does it only give an advantage if you are rock climbing? I do realize the Trailhawk has a few other additions like skid plates and a 0.8 inch lift, but those don't seem like useful things for driving in snow or on rough roads.

What do you think?
I'm not a 4x4 expert. But I think the Trail Hawk is really designed for moderate off-roading - and wouldn't really give you much benefit on the road or snow. And in fact, if you were after some of the fancy, schmancy safety features, they aren't available on the TH. Good Luck!
 

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You will be fine with the Latitude, the Trailhawk would be overkill. The only real advantage is the .8 inch lift if the snow depth is much of an issue, and if so there may be a lift kit to take care of that you can have added later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You will be fine with the Latitude, the Trailhawk would be overkill. The only real advantage is the .8 inch lift if the snow depth is much of an issue, and if so there may be a lift kit to take care of that you can have added later.
That's exactly what I was thinking. In my limited past experience, the tires seem to make the most difference in snow handling. I don't have the space to store an extra set of wheels/tires nor do I want to be bothered changing them out every winter & spring, so I'm thinking I'd get a Latitude and then switch to a more rugged tire like the ones on the Trailhawk, perhaps even something better as I hear the standard Goodyear tires that Jeep puts on their cars are not really so good.
 

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Hey all, I'm new to the forum and just registered today. This is a somewhat long post, so please bear with me.....

I'm really excited that the Renegade is coming out soon. I've been looking for a car like this for a long time, and IMO this is the first one like it and does not really have any competition.

Here is what I want in a vehicle:

1) 4WD/AWD - I will never go off road, but as I live in the Northeast, we get quite a bit of snow, and I need to be able to drive through snow. Also, the broken roads around here are terrible, so sometimes driving on a bad road can be like going off road.

2) High seating position - I injured my back a few years ago and can no longer sit comfortably in a regular car for more than a little while. So I need the higher seating position to be comfortable on longer trips

3) I do a ton of highway driving, so it needs to be fuel efficient.

4) I prefer a small car. I'm a single guy with no kids, so I don't really care about the "utility" part of the SUV. I'd take a 2-seater SUV if they made such a thing.


So due to my back injury, about a year and a half ago I decided I can no longer drive a regular car and needed to get a car with a higher seating position. I hate really large cars, so my choices were very limited. In the end I found only 4 cars that fit the bill and I ended up leasing a totally stripped BMW X1. It's a nice car, but a bit plain looking and I wish it was a little higher up. The only other cars I found that were suitable were the Subaru Crosstrek (too slow), the Jeep Patriot (I considered this), and Range Rover Evoque (loved it, but was too expensive for me).

My lease ends next year, so I think I'll most likely be getting a Renegade. What I'm wondering is if there is any advantage to getting a Trailhawk considering I don't go off road. I'd actually much prefer getting a Latitude 4x4 with the 1.4L Turbo and 6-speed manual, and then maybe switch the all season tires out for some more rugged tires like the General Grabber AT2s (yes I checked and they come in 215/65/16 which is the tire size for the base Latitude). I figure that would make it better in snow.

Is there any advantage of the 4WD system on the Trailhawk when you are driving in snow, or does it only give an advantage if you are rock climbing? I do realize the Trailhawk has a few other additions like skid plates and a 0.8 inch lift, but those don't seem like useful things for driving in snow or on rough roads.

What do you think?
according to jeep,no, the TH AWD system doesn't work any better in snow. The stiffer suspension in the TH might be rough on your back.
 

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I currently own a 2.0 Multijet 4x4 Limited opening edition and for that i can really speak for this car.

You don´t need the Trailhawk either to drive in Snow ... the 4x4 Limited does well in Snow out there. But don´t get those ATs for snow ... they are good for Mud and Paved Road ... on Snow you just need Winter Tires they are profiled for snow and Ice ... the ATs are rarely better than onroad Tires ...

I also have a rotten Back but the Seats in the Renegade (Leather, heated with Lordose Back) just work fine for me ...

 

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Well,
Let''s start to say that if you need fuel efficiency in highway you will not find if in the renegade. Fuel consumption is not as reported in the data sheet.
Said that, about comfort I suggest you to a get eventually 215 60 r17 tyres instead of 55 r18 rims, you'll notice a lot of difference.

if you don't need water fording capability and moderate off road a simply limited 4WD is for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Actually here in the US it seems the Latitude with the 1.4L Turbo and the 6-speed comes with 215/65/16 tires, which is fine with me because it'll have a softer ride. Also, I realize many ATs do not provide better snow traction, but the General Grabbers do for sure. They are actually rated as not only an AT but a snow tire as well and I have read great reviews of them. I was actually surprised that they come in this size, but they do. They don't come in the size on the Trailhawk (215/65/17) or any of the other tire sizes from any other renegade wheel/tire package combo.
 

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Also, I realize many ATs do not provide better snow traction, but the General Grabbers do for sure. They are actually rated as not only an AT but a snow tire as well and I have read great reviews of them. I was actually surprised that they come in this size, but they do.
I liked the look of the AT2 so I went looking, I found this snow caution, so double check on them:
GeneralGrabber AT 2
Size: 215/65R16
Not Rated For Severe Snow
Add Studding: $15 each

NOTE: While many of the Grabber AT2 On-/Off-Road All-Terrain tires meet industry severe snow service requirements and are branded with the mountain/snowflake symbol, some do not. Specific tires/sizes not meeting the industry's requirements are identified with a "Not Rated For Severe Snow" notation on Sizes & Prices, as well as on Specs. Grabber AT2 tires are designed to accept optional #13 metal studs to enhance ice traction.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=General&tireModel=Grabber+AT+2&partnum=165TR6GRAT2
 

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Your profile says you live in NJ. I live in southeastern PA and work in central NJ, so I'm familiar with the weather. Get yourself a good set of all-season tires and drive smart and you'll be fine in just about any weather Mother Nature throws at us in this region of the country. Heck, I've driven (out of absolute necessity, only) on Michelin Pilot Sports in light snow in my Audi quattro and got around fairly well considering the summer-only tires.

Regarding the AT2s you're considering, they look like overkill for this part of the country where we have mild snow for about two months out of the year with the occasional moderate snowfall and rare heavy snowfall. Just looking at the structure of the tread on these tires, they're clearly designed for lots of use in snow/mud/dirt/rocks/etc. I'm guessing they'll sacrifice quite a bit of handling and increase road noise in the name of traction that you'll use only a few times every year. Just my $.02 :)
 

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This might not meet your needs but given your situation I'd consider getting a FWD version. You'll get better fuel economy than the 4x4 and if you equip it in the winter with a good set of snow tires you should be fine. A FWD vehicle with proper tires should be more than sufficient unless your trying to off road in the snow or tackle unplowed roads in heavy snow conditions where you need the extra traction to gain momentum. You'll get better mileage and better comfort as well by using all seasons and winters when required as opposed to aggressive AT's year round.

Personally I'm considering a Limited 4x4 even though the advise above applies to me as well. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm not actually sure if the FWD renegade will be that much of a difference in gas mileage than the 4x4. One of their big advertising points is that it has the disconnecting rear drivetrain, so that when you're in good weather and on the highway, you are essentially driving a FWD vehicle. So the only gas mileage advantages of the FWD would then be the slightly lower height that helps aerodynamics just a bit and the weight difference which is about 150 lbs. Between both of those, I can't imagine a difference of more than 1-2 mpg.

As for the tires, yes I realize they may be somewhat overkill, but I live in a more rural area of NJ and they never plow the roads around here, so often times it can snow 5 inches and I don't want to wait all day for them to plow the road. From what I have read the ATs are getting better and better now on road and the amount of noise you get is very limited.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I liked the look of the AT2 so I went looking, I found this snow caution, so double check on them:
BTW, this snow caution you mentioned is due to the size of the tire, not the compound or tread. Apparently there are regulations in some places that require a certain size/type of tire and these are too small to be certified. But the same tire in a larger size does indeed have that snowflake symbol and is certified for severe snow.

So basically what you are pointing out is that it's the Renegade itself that is not certified for severe snow, not the tire. I've looked through all different tires, and these were the best tires in the snow that can also be used all year on and off road, or so I have read.
 

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I'm not actually sure if the FWD renegade will be that much of a difference in gas mileage than the 4x4. One of their big advertising points is that it has the disconnecting rear drivetrain, so that when you're in good weather and on the highway, you are essentially driving a FWD vehicle. So the only gas mileage advantages of the FWD would then be the slightly lower height that helps aerodynamics just a bit and the weight difference which is about 150 lbs. Between both of those, I can't imagine a difference of more than 1-2 mpg.

As for the tires, yes I realize they may be somewhat overkill, but I live in a more rural area of NJ and they never plow the roads around here, so often times it can snow 5 inches and I don't want to wait all day for them to plow the road. From what I have read the ATs are getting better and better now on road and the amount of noise you get is very limited.
There's weight, for FWD vs. trialhawk, there's aerodynamics of the front fascia, and theirs parasitic load onthe rear wheels. I do not believe it disconnects at the axles, so the rear wheels will always be spinning some additional mass with them. Then there is the transfer case and the driveline drag that causes if the disconnect is after the transfer case.
 

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Given your priorities, you should test drive the Nissan Juke and the Mazda CC3. They're the hot performers of the group, but the worst in terms of cargo space. If you care less about performance, I'd test drive a Honda HRV.

You can test drive the Nissan Juke today. The HRV and CX3 around spring from what I hear.
 
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