Jeep Renegade Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Should I have any concerns about purchasing the first model Renegade. Are 1st edition vehicles more likely to have problems or is this just a myth. I know the engine and transmission are already used in other Jeeps and the body will be used from current Fiat models. Both fiat and jeep have been in business for 200 years combined which makes me feel a little better about making a purchase. Just wondering if anyone is holding off to make a purchase because of this or just going all in based on the companies histories.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
Should I have any concerns about purchasing the first model Renegade. Are 1st edition vehicles more likely to have problems or is this just a myth. I know the engine and transmission are already used in other Jeeps and the body will be used from current Fiat models. Both fiat and jeep have been in business for 200 years combined which makes me feel a little better about making a purchase. Just wondering if anyone is holding off to make a purchase because of this or just going all in based on the companies histories.
There's no guarantees. There are basically two categories for systemic problems. Engineering problems, and problems with labor adapting to the requirements of manufacture.

Labor problems can be hashed out as production goes on. Engineering problems basically stick until a refresh or redesign.

My first concern is a new engine and/or transmission as they are both complex to design and assemble, and with tight tolerances compared to the rest of the car.

I've jumped into the first model year before. A 2005 Subaru legacy gt. It had the better part of a year production in Japan first, the engine had been out for over a year in a different model, and the transmission was a lightly modified version of one in several other cars with a good track record.

Biggest problem with it is how they engineered the dashboard retention. They didn't fix that until the 2008 model.

I had a couple issues with how stuff was assembled that were apparent in the first couple thousand miles and they were easy dealer fixes. They weren't common because they were labor issues that got sorted really quickly.

Probably the biggest risk are mid year changes for safety. They are relatively uncommon though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
I think as far as build quality and engineering go, I wouldn't fear too much as computer models and simulators that companies can test the vehicles in real world conditions.

I have a first model year Dodge Dart, they made some big changes between MY1 and MY2.

1.) MY1 Darts have storage under the passenger seat, remove in MY2
2.) The engine available were different between year, the engine and transmission in my car is no longer available in my trim level
3.) The leather changed between the two model years.
4.) Some of the extra interior lighting was remove for MY2

I'm glad I got a first year Dart as some of the niceties were removed in the second model year.

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
A good option is always leasing a first model year. That way you can try the vehicle for a couple years, if there are updates you like, trade it in towards the newer model or you can purchase your leased vehicle if you like.

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Well let's see, the first year of the JK had numerous engine failures and leaks. So they ended up redesigning the hard top panels and recalling engines. The first year of the new Grand Cherokee had major failures of engine heads so all of those eventually got recalled and wasn't totally fixed until the third model year. The first year of the new Cherokee had massive transmission issues and those, too, were recalled and "fixed".

If you wanted, you could go back through history with ALL major brands and look at the first model year of each vehicle and find problems that were corrected in 2-4 years after production began. That's why people always say "don't buy the first model year of anything". There's truth behind it.

My 2001 Grand Cherokee was in the early run that had cylinder heads that cracked. That was corrected from 2002-on. My other vehicle is a Ford Mustang GT. The 2005-early 2008 models had spark plugs that would break off in the heads and cost a LOT of money to repair. They didn't get that fixed until the second half of 2008...three and a half model years later!

There will certainly be teething issues with the Renegade for the next 24 months at least.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well let's see, the first year of the JK had numerous engine failures and leaks. So they ended up redesigning the hard top panels and recalling engines. The first year of the new Grand Cherokee had major failures of engine heads so all of those eventually got recalled and wasn't totally fixed until the third model year. The first year of the new Cherokee had massive transmission issues and those, too, were recalled and "fixed".

If you wanted, you could go back through history with ALL major brands and look at the first model year of each vehicle and find problems that were corrected in 2-4 years after production began. That's why people always say "don't buy the first model year of anything". There's truth behind it.

My 2001 Grand Cherokee was in the early run that had cylinder heads that cracked. That was corrected from 2002-on. My other vehicle is a Ford Mustang GT. The 2005-early 2008 models had spark plugs that would break off in the heads and cost a LOT of money to repair. They didn't get that fixed until the second half of 2008...three and a half model years later!

There will certainly be teething issues with the Renegade for the next 24 months at least.
Yes I'm sure minor things will pop up which is the case with any vehicle. Im guessing this is why Jeep already has a 2017 refresh scheduled for the Renegade when is isn't even out yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
Yes I'm sure minor things will pop up which is the case with any vehicle. Im guessing this is why Jeep already has a 2017 refresh scheduled for the Renegade when is isn't even out yet.
Also, because cars take about 5 years from design to roll out. I'd put money they have a very early prototype of the refresh Renegade built and testing since it has maybe 24 to 30 months before it is released in late 2016 or early 2017.

Scott
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
Also, because cars take about 5 years from design to roll out. I'd put money they have a very early prototype of the refresh Renegade built and testing since it has maybe 24 to 30 months before it is released in late 2016 or early 2017.

Scott
Rernegade refresh appears to be model year 2018 based on the fact it shwos starting in calendar year 2014. So late 2017 calendar year. I.e. the usual 3 year cosmetic refresh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
Rernegade refresh appears to be model year 2018 based on the fact it shwos starting in calendar year 2014. So late 2017 calendar year. I.e. the usual 3 year cosmetic refresh.
TO be honest, was related to the Journey refresh not the Renegade. I still believe that have an early model of the refresh built or some of the redesign parts/systems.

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well its good to know that the engine and transmission have been used in other vehicle models that are already in production, and hopefully all those issues are worked out. One issue I see is the MySky roof leaking. I can see this because I'm sure the testing doesn't have enough time to see it doesn't leak over time. I know the Wranglers had issues with the 3 piece hard top leaking at first. The MySky looks cool but not my top feature I want to purchase depending on the price of it anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
well lets not forget that the enhgine and transmission have had significant time in the Dart, the KL and the new 200, same goes for the AWD system...
About the only thing different between the Renegade and the current AWD system could be gear ratios. Both final drive ratio and transmission gearing. Other than that I think most of the "bugs" will be worked out. Final assembly and labor issues, if any, will hopefully be worked out by the time US models are on the assembly line.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
Well its good to know that the engine and transmission have been used in other vehicle models that are already in production, and hopefully all those issues are worked out. One issue I see is the MySky roof leaking. I can see this because I'm sure the testing doesn't have enough time to see it doesn't leak over time. I know the Wranglers had issues with the 3 piece hard top leaking at first. The MySky looks cool but not my top feature I want to purchase depending on the price of it anyway.
I agree. Mysky is the biggest risk factor besides electrical gremlins and squeaks and rattles.

But it's not British nor is it a VW, so that gives a pretty solid fighting chance on electrical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,445 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
About the only thing different between the Renegade and the current AWD system could be gear ratios. Both final drive ratio and transmission gearing. Other than that I think most of the "bugs" will be worked out. Final assembly and labor issues, if any, will hopefully be worked out by the time US models are on the assembly line.
Hi RW, we do have to worry about wet dogs.

Jeep Active Drive:
To those of familiar with the KL Cherokee Jeep Active Drive should be familiar to you. The key difference between the KL Cherokee and the BU Renegade is that the KL's system uses dog clutches while the BU Renegade uses a wet clutch system.
I mean the Cherokee transfer case has "dog clutches" and the Reneogade transfer case has a "wet clutch" system.

So there is a small difference, maybe someone that knows more on this could explain?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
I hadn't really thought about the MySky roof leaking before. What ever seal they have around the panels needs to be able to hold up over time. I can see it breaking down over a few years, especially if you end up taking the roof on and off quite a bit. I'll make sure to give that an extra close inspection before laying down a deposit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,445 Posts
I hadn't really thought about the MySky roof leaking before. What ever seal they have around the panels needs to be able to hold up over time. I can see it breaking down over a few years, especially if you end up taking the roof on and off quite a bit. I'll make sure to give that an extra close inspection before laying down a deposit.
The thing that sucks about this is you may not be able to spot a leak just by looking at it, all may look fine until it rains one day. At least if and when that happens, you already have an idea of what it could be.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top