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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in Colorado. A blizzard blew in last night. I left Aurora at 5 a.m. I got to Ft. Carson at 9:30. This is normally a 60 min commute.

On the way south to I-25 I pulled two cars out of drifts. That is, my TrailHawk and I stopped, attached a recovery strap, and pulled them back on to the road in a foot of snow.

I proceeded south and stopped at exit 181.

I waited for 40 mins while a 100 car pile up was cleared from I-25. I then pulled a police cruiser out of a drift.

I continued south.

The road was plowed for a distance, then wasn't. I didn't see a lot of vehicles, and the ones I did, were mostly Jeeps...

So the next time some [email protected] fool says a Renegade isn't a "real" jeep...
 

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Bwahahaha nice!

I originally looked at the Renegade because I loved my Kia Soul, but wanted something a bit higher & with AWD. Renegade fit that perfectly. Got it last week, took it out for a trail run last weekend, had a blast. It doesn't necessarily look like a regular Jeep, but it definitely can hold its own! Very much looking forward to playing in the winter!

Only thing I'm debating is whether or not I should get some snow shoes to save wear & tear on the stocks. Blizzaks for 5 months & then the original all-seasons for the rest of the year...
 

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I live in Colorado. A blizzard blew in last night. I left Aurora at 5 a.m. I got to Ft. Carson at 9:30. This is normally a 60 min commute.

On the way south to I-25 I pulled two cars out of drifts. That is, my TrailHawk and I stopped, attached a recovery strap, and pulled them back on to the road in a foot of snow.

I proceeded south and stopped at exit 181.

I waited for 40 mins while a 100 car pile up was cleared from I-25. I then pulled a police cruiser out of a drift.

I continued south.

The road was plowed for a distance, then wasn't. I didn't see a lot of vehicles, and the ones I did, were mostly Jeeps...

So the next time some [email protected] fool says a Renegade isn't a "real" jeep...
awesome!
 

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Nice. Are you still running the stock Trailhawk tires? I wondered how they perform in the snow.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Tires were great

Nice. Are you still running the stock Trailhawk tires? I wondered how they perform in the snow.
I have 15k miles on the stock tires. They did break traction a couple times, but it was still controlled... at 65 mph.

What I'm saying is they performed as expected, and I will replace these tires with the same kind (likely).
 

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I live in Colorado. A blizzard blew in last night. I left Aurora at 5 a.m. I got to Ft. Carson at 9:30. This is normally a 60 min commute.

On the way south to I-25 I pulled two cars out of drifts. That is, my TrailHawk and I stopped, attached a recovery strap, and pulled them back on to the road in a foot of snow.

I proceeded south and stopped at exit 181.

I waited for 40 mins while a 100 car pile up was cleared from I-25. I then pulled a police cruiser out of a drift.

I continued south.

The road was plowed for a distance, then wasn't. I didn't see a lot of vehicles, and the ones I did, were mostly Jeeps...

So the next time some [email protected] fool says a Renegade isn't a "real" jeep...
Wow. That's Badass. You're Badass.
 

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Here are some notes from a long-time 4 wheeler about this post. First, one of the reasons that the Trailhawk was able to pull this off (excuse the pun) is that it is fairly heavy vehicle. Of course, that is also one of the reasons that it only can achieve mediocre fuel economy. Second, the OP posted that he pulled out the vehicles that were stuck with a tow strap. That is also advantageous in that the towing vehicle can get a little motion going before the tow strap's slack is pulled up and the strap will actually act as a torque multiplier--given the Trailhawk's relative lack of low-end torque, that latter point is pretty important. Had he tried to pull those vehicles out with a tow chain (no "stretch" or torque multiplication with a chain), the Trailhawk probably couldn't have done it. Third, I really doubt that the stuck vehicles were "deep stuck." If they were, about the only way to pull them out is with a vehicle with considerably greater mass. As an example, last winter, near where I live, there was an AWD vehicle stuck that was about the same size and weight as a Trailhawk, but it was "deep stuck" in a snowdrift. Everything up to a one-ton dual wheel 4WD fully loaded truck in 4WD with the rear differential locked and with chains on the rear could not even budge it. What got it out? An AWD 20,000 lb.+ road grader with the rear tandems chained up. People should not be deluded into thinking that the Trailhawk (or any other vehicle) has extraordinary capability to unstick really stuck vehicles--the Trailhawk is subject to the laws of physics like any other vehicle. As to the "real Jeep" thing, well, a Subaru Forester or Outback with X-Mode would have likely been able to do the same thing that the OP did under the same conditions.
 

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Here are some notes from a long-time 4 wheeler about this post. First, one of the reasons that the Trailhawk was able to pull this off (excuse the pun) is that it is fairly heavy vehicle. Of course, that is also one of the reasons that it only can achieve mediocre fuel economy. Second, the OP posted that he pulled out the vehicles that were stuck with a tow strap. That is also advantageous in that the towing vehicle can get a little motion going before the tow strap's slack is pulled up and the strap will actually act as a torque multiplier--given the Trailhawk's relative lack of low-end torque, that latter point is pretty important. Had he tried to pull those vehicles out with a tow chain (no "stretch" or torque multiplication with a chain), the Trailhawk probably couldn't have done it. Third, I really doubt that the stuck vehicles were "deep stuck." If they were, about the only way to pull them out is with a vehicle with considerably greater mass. As an example, last winter, near where I live, there was an AWD vehicle stuck that was about the same size and weight as a Trailhawk, but it was "deep stuck" in a snowdrift. Everything up to a one-ton dual wheel 4WD fully loaded truck in 4WD with the rear differential locked and with chains on the rear could not even budge it. What got it out? An AWD 20,000 lb.+ road grader with the rear tandems chained up. People should not be deluded into thinking that the Trailhawk (or any other vehicle) has extraordinary capability to unstick really stuck vehicles--the Trailhawk is subject to the laws of physics like any other vehicle. As to the "real Jeep" thing, well, a Subaru Forester or Outback with X-Mode would have likely been able to do the same thing that the OP did under the same conditions.
Thanks for your opinion railguy.:)
The renegade is the lightest vehicle I have owned for a long time.
Whether any other cars could or could not have done it is not the point.
People are implying the renegade has no actual ability.
It seems it may have.
 

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^I do believe that the Renegade Trailhawk has more backcountry/bad road condition 4WD capability than a lot of AWD cars (the Subaru Outback and Forester being the exception--they have good ground clearance and the AWD system does well in snow, mud, and fairly rough road conditions). Does the Trailhawk measure up to "true" 4WD's that are fully designed for difficult backcountry use? Probably not. That said, I suspect that all of the Renegades will be fairly decent snow and inclement weather vehicles IF they have good winter tires.


A lot depends on what the owner expects from the vehicle. People who like the Trailhawk will say that it is a versatile CUV with some off-road capability. Those who don't will say that the Trailhawk is a compromise that is a crappy car and a crappy 4WD. In a sense, both opinions are right.
 

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I think the Trailhawk has the same clearance as the forester does it not?

Within a quarter of an inch, according to the specs. The Forester also has an aftermarket lift kit that is available that will allow slightly larger diameter tires and will increase the ground clearance by likely another 1/2" to 3/4". There are also some aftermarket skid plates available that aren't too expensive that will also make the Forester more backcountry capable.


The downer about the Forester (unlike its cousin, the Outback) is that one must spring for the higher trim levels to get their X-Mode system, and that pushes the Forester price right up to the level of the Trailhawk. (If Subaru was smart, they would make X-Mode standard on the Forester on all trim levels and make it standard on all the XV Crosstreks--on the Crosstreks X-Mode isn't even an option at this point. If Subaru did that, they would pirate a large number of potential Trailhawk sales.) As for fuel economy, the 2.5 Subie engine in the Forester beats the Trailhawk significantly in fuel economy. That said, the powerful turbo available in the Forester gets somewhat worse fuel economy than the Trailhawk, and on required premium fuel, to boot. Unless things change a lot, the Forester should handily beat the Trailhawk in reliability.


I don't say all of this to push people to buy Subarus, but it is instructive as to what FC should do to make the Renegade a more capable and reliable vehicle.
 

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I didn't want a forester because I din't want an automatic and wasn't going to buy what Subaru implied was an inferior version.
So I bought a Trailhawk?
And yet I felt I was being calculated and reasoning throughout.
 
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