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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I had my oil changed in May at 3700 miles and I'm now at just under 7000 miles and I'm getting the "Oil change required" light. Why is it popping up so soon? Do I really need it changed? On my last Renegade I never got an indicator light once and I only had the oil changed once a year. I'm not driving it any different that normal.
 

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For what it is worth the 3 times I have changed my oil it was always before the light came on but I still went through the oil indicator reset procedure. So even if the light isn't on it will reset with the procedure.
 

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For what it is worth the 3 times I have changed my oil it was always before the light came on but I still went through the oil indicator reset procedure. So even if the light isn't on it will reset with the procedure.
I had that exact question. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok.. so if it were you guys... would you reset it and just take it when you would normally take it for an oil change or have it changed now just in case?
 

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You are good until at least 5,000 miles if you used the correct required synthetic oil. Since it went till 7,000 and assuming he indicator wasn't reset it's probably good for 7000 since the change. Bit if it will worry you do it at 5000 since the last oil change. That's my thoughts.
 

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I may be a bit OT here but I have to say I am, and has been for a long time, fascinated by the difference in oil change intervall between US and Europe (or atleast Sweden were I am).
The car with the shortest intervall I´ve ever had was a high horsepower Japanese car that wanted new oil every 6,000 miles. I´ve had quite a few Audi/VW/Skoda that has service intervall at 18,600 miles, without oil-change in between. My Renegade is serviced every 12,500 miles (as by dealer recomendations), and only ones have the "change oil" message come on before the service. "no one" changes oil between services among regular car owners. I once had a neighbor that changes oil every 3,000 miles on his old diesel Volvo. Everyone thougt he was crazy.... :)
I know we started using synthetic oil earlier then in the US but I believe we use the same types os oil since quite a few years now so I can't really figure out the difference...
 

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I may be a bit OT here but I have to say I am, and has been for a long time, fascinated by the difference in oil change intervall between US and Europe (or atleast Sweden were I am).
The car with the shortest intervall I´ve ever had was a high horsepower Japanese car that wanted new oil every 6,000 miles. I´ve had quite a few Audi/VW/Skoda that has service intervall at 18,600 miles, without oil-change in between. My Renegade is serviced every 12,500 miles (as by dealer recomendations), and only ones have the "change oil" message come on before the service. "no one" changes oil between services among regular car owners. I once had a neighbor that changes oil every 3,000 miles on his old diesel Volvo. Everyone thougt he was crazy.... :)
I know we started using synthetic oil earlier then in the US but I believe we use the same types os oil since quite a few years now so I can't really figure out the difference...
I am too. My other car is a Nissan 370z. The car is the same mechanically across the world all built in Japan. Look at the intervals mentioned in the owners manual below. First is Europe, second is North America. 9K miles in Europe, 5K in North America.

This is my theory (and is supported by the footnote in the Europe interval). North America is very diverse, from climates like your Sweden to punishing deserts in Nevada and Arizona. I think they are being safe and stating the worst case shortest interval in North America. The North American interval has no footnote saying it might have to be shorter. The Europe one (and others I have seen) do. Seeing how the US is very lawsuit crazy and we have strong lemon laws as well, I think its the car companies legally protecting themselves from lawsuits and expensive warranty repairs for people driving them in those extreme desert conditions.

I have no proof, just a theory and some supporting data in that footnote.

The only other reason would be poorer quality oil and oil filters, and while that may have been true decades ago when synthetic oil wasn't used much in the US, that is no longer true.
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This is my theory (and is supported by the footnote in the Europe interval). North America is very diverse, from climates like your Sweden to punishing deserts in Nevada and Arizona. I think they are being safe and stating the worst case shortest interval in North America. The North American interval has no footnote saying it might have to be shorter. The Europe one (and others I have seen) do. Seeing how the US is very lawsuit crazy and we have strong lemon laws as well, I think its the car companies legally protecting themselves from lawsuits and expensive warranty repairs for people driving them in those extreme desert conditions.
This was my thought too. The variety of environments in the US compared to that of much smaller European counties, leads to manufacturers having to use a "worst case scenario" rule. Along with how much the US loves to sue for every minor inconvenience. It's a big "Cover You A**" move more than likely.
 

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I am too. My other car is a Nissan 370z. The car is the same mechanically across the world all built in Japan. Look at the intervals mentioned in the owners manual below. First is Europe, second is North America. 9K miles in Europe, 5K in North America.

This is my theory (and is supported by the footnote in the Europe interval). North America is very diverse, from climates like your Sweden to punishing deserts in Nevada and Arizona. I think they are being safe and stating the worst case shortest interval in North America. The North American interval has no footnote saying it might have to be shorter. The Europe one (and others I have seen) do. Seeing how the US is very lawsuit crazy and we have strong lemon laws as well, I think its the car companies legally protecting themselves from lawsuits and expensive warranty repairs for people driving them in those extreme desert conditions.

I have no proof, just a theory and some supporting data in that footnote.

The only other reason would be poorer quality oil and oil filters, and while that may have been true decades ago when synthetic oil wasn't used much in the US, that is no longer true.
That may be the explanation. As you say we don't have parts that is as warm as the deserts, we have plenty och cold places but that maybe doesn't have the same effect on the oil as the heat.
 
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