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Does anyone know the type and grade of oil the dealer is supposed to be using for an oil change ? The reason I ask is that my dealer was not even aware it is supposed to be a synthetic. This may be something we all have to watch since there is no sticker on the engine saying what to use unlike other vehicles.
 

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Does anyone know the type and grade of oil the dealer is supposed to be using for an oil change ? The reason I ask is that my dealer was not even aware it is supposed to be a synthetic. This may be something we all have to watch since there is no sticker on the engine saying what to use unlike other vehicles.
this is what is in the manual

Engine Oil With Filter
1.4L Turbo Engine (SAE 5W-40 Synthetic, API Certified) 4.0 Quarts 3.8 Liters
2.4L Engine (SAE 0W-20, API Certified) 5.5 Quarts 5.2 Liters
 

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here is some more info Page 583

Engine Oil – 1.4L TurboEngine

We recommend you use SAE 5W-40 API Certified Synthetic Engine Oil, meeting the
requirements of FCA US Material Standard MS-12991 such as MOPAR, Pennzoil, and
Shell Helix. Refer to your engine oil filler cap for correct SAE grade.

Engine Oil – 2.4L Engine

We recommend you use SAE 0W-20 API Certified Engine Oil, meeting the requirements
of FCA US Material Standard MS-6395 such as MOPAR, Pennzoil, and Shell Helix. Refer
to your engine oil filler cap for correct SAE grade.
 

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We have Jeep(Wrangler) 4X4 sports model and my husband's maintenance of the vehicle is perfect. Average monthly running of the vehicle is more than 2000 kms as such it require service after every three months. From we get our vehicle serviced they always use Midas synthetic engine oil. It maintains the higher viscosity stability and Reduce oil thickening.


http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K76LRE0
 

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If you go with the manufacturers recommendations you can't go wrong. If you take your vehicle in for an oil change be sure to discuss required oil grades with the person doing the job. If they don't have what you need, do not accept a substitute.
 

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So with the 2.4L is the recommended 0w20 oil a synthetic oil? Is the oil that came in the car from the factory synthetic? I called the dealership I purchased the car from and they said it is a synthetic oil change for $80. I also inquired about the oil change message telling when to change the oil and he said not to go more than 5,000 miles. I called two other jeep dealers in the area and they were around $40 with no mention of the 0w20 being synthetic. Any thoughts/comments/recommendations?
 

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Since 2011 (Honda Fit) all 0w-20 oils I have found were full synthetic. Not all 0w-20 oils meet Chrysler
standard MS-6395. Mobil 1 doesn't.

The Renegade owners manual reads (The oil and filter replacement must be carried out when indicated
by a warning light or a message on the instrument panel, or in any case should not exceed 1 year or 10,000 miles.) Why would a dealer say not to exceed 5,000 miles?

From my 4 years experience with a Honda Fit the maintenance minder light usually came on around
8,000 miles. I have over 5,000 miles on the Renegade
and so far no light. I'll wait until the light/message
comes on before changing


Clifton
 

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The Renegade owners manual reads (The oil and filter replacement must be carried out when indicated
by a warning light or a message on the instrument panel, or in any case should not exceed 1 year or 10,000 miles.) Why would a dealer say not to exceed 5,000 miles?
The dealer hopes to make a buck every 5k miles. Although many cars now come with an OLM and allow up to 2 year/12000 mile oil change intervals, the 5k or even the traditional 3k mile oil change is at least in the US still being pushed by quick lube places and many mechanics who rely on frequent oil changes as a source of steady income. Pretty much only severe service (extended idling, many cold starts, very dusty environment, driving lot under heavy load, towing, mountain driving) necessitate a shortened OCI.

With all my vehicles I have used the manufacturer recommendation as a starting point and gone from there. I send regularly oil samples into a lab to have a UOA done and decide based on the result if my oil change interval is okay, too long, or if it can be extended. Based on my results I do 10 to 12k mile/once-a-year intervals with an oil that has proven to work very well in my application.

Not all OLMs are created equal, some are more complex, others just make a simple algorithm-based guess based on how much fuel has been consumed by the engine. Others will take into account also starting cycles, RPM, distance driven and other parameters that affect oil life.
 

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No. The 2.4 does not need it but you can use 0w20 synthetic.
Only the 1.4 turbo "needs" synthetic,due to the turbo.
With 0W-20 you will be hard-pressed to find a mineral oil that can meet the required specs, especially shear stability. While one can probably concoct a 0W-20 from mineral oil, it will quickly shear out of grade and become quite unsuitable.

All 0W-x oil require at least hydrocracked (Group III) base oil with at least some fully synthetic Group IV (PAO-Polyalphaolephin) or Group V (ester) oil in it.

Shear stability is especially important with low HTHS (high temperature.high shear) oils like 0W-20, since there is not much of an excess viscosity buffer once the oil shears. Loss of hydrodynamic lubrication when the oil is very hot and when the engine is under load, requires boundary lubrication to take over for wear protection. In my opinion, reaching this point is best avoided. The highest HTHS you can find in any 0W-20 oil is around 2.9. I feel generally more comfortable with an oil that has HTHS >/=3.5. The latter cannot be achieved with 0W-20, but it is possible with some 0W-30 oils.

I am not advising anybody to use anything else than the Chrysler-recommended oil viscosites (certified to meet the required specs), but I know I'd find it hard to not tinker with my own engine based on my own experience and prejudices. YMMV.

For anybody who cares, there is a discussion about why Mobil 1 does not have a 0W-20 oil that is certified to meet Chrysler 6395 : http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=2629126
 

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Beware that the engine oil in the 2.4 or 1.4 engines is also used by MultiAir module, that is the electro-hydraulic variable valve system (for intake valves).
Yes, MultiAir may be as finicky about viscosity as BMW's VANOS, which means not very much. Consider that a 0W-20 oil when cold is much thicker than a 0W-30 oil when at operating temperatures. This means, if MultiAir functions properly with 0W-20 oil when cold, a 0W-30 oil will not be "too thick" at operating temperature either.

The question is whether the 0W-20 recommended viscosity is pushed due to CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) or because of other functional engineering needs. Since US oil recommendations are generally calling for a grade below the recommendation for the same engines in the Euro market, I tend to attribute the thinner oil trend to mostly CAFE, which is all about fuel economy. In countries with higher speeds limits, more importance is placed on engine protection and thus higher HTHS oils are generally recommended.

For example, my current car calls for 5W-30 API SJ in the US manual. The Euro manual calls for 5W-40 and manufacturer-specfic certifications like VW 502 and Euro specs like ACEA A3. The oil recommendations are market-driven, based primarily on fuel economy versus engine protection. It's again the proverbial cake that you can't have and eat.
 

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According to Mobil 1's website, 0W-20 now meets the Chrysler MS-6395 spec.
Hello,
No Mobil1 Oil meets Chrysler MS-6395, Mobil Super 0W 20 Full Synthetic however does and they are two totally different motor oils and I have spoken to them on three different occasions and was told it could only be run for 7,500k or 6 months, not saying I agree with that though I will not chance it.
TOTO.
 

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Personally, in my turbo charged vehicles I have always run Red Line 5w-40 after engine break in, and changed at 6k intervals. I put a lot of miles on my vehicles so I opt for a more frequent change interval instead of relying on the vehicle's sensors or algorithms.

My non turbo'ed vehicles got whatever viscosity of Mobil 1 synthetic was listed in the Manual.

I know Red Line is not API/Mopar/Chrysler/ etc. certified, but the used oil analysis (UOA) I had done on my old Audi TT showed the oil held up really well.

I originally ran the Mobil 1 5w-40 in my old Audi TT, but the UOA's I had done came back saying the oil had sheared from 5w-40 to 5w-30 and it was most likely because of the heat and pressures in the turbo.

Did some research and everything I found recommended either Royal Purple or Red Line for Turbo charged vehicles. Went with Red Line and haven't looked back.

Figured if it was good enough for the Audi, the Renegade with be just as happy. Planning on doing a UOA after the 12k or 18k oil change just to see how things are going.

Ohh and don't get the 5w-40 Red Line Racing Oil (or any racing oil), unless you want to ruin your CAT and O2 sensors.
 
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