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First of all, I like my Renegade a lot. With studded winter tires the grip and traction is incredible. I have never driven anything that can compare. The comfort is also very good. And it's a fun car to drive.

Now over to the not so good. Jeep must have done a really bad job testing the car in cold climate. When the outside temperature went down to around -15 °C (5 °F) and lower, the car started to show all kinds of fault/alerts like Serv 4WD, Check parking or electronic brake, Stop/start unavailable and Check Engine. In addition, after driving for 40 minutes at moderate speeds and then leaving the car for 24 hours in -25 °C (-13 °F) , the battery didn’t have enough charge to start the car. I checked the battery and it is only 72 Ah which in my opinion is insufficient for climates where the temperature can get down to -30 °C. After a night of charging the battery and a couple of hours with the block heater on, the car started. When the outside temperature went up warmer than -15 °C (5 °F), the messages disappeared. When Check Engine is showing, the car is only front wheel drive.

The most stupid or laughable effect of these faults was the following: The car said Stop/start unavailable and the system could not be turned on with the button. When I came to work I drove slowly into my parking space and braked the car to a stop half way into the space. Then the car decided to activate the stop/start system and automatically stopped the engine. The problem was that the system was apparently still unavailable so when I released the brake pedal the car wouldn’t start automatically. I had to switch off the ignition and then on again to start the car and drive it the last meter into the parking space.

I really hope that Jeep has software-updates to fix these issues, but I fear that these low temperature problems are unknown to Jeep and that my car will not be fixed this winter…

Anyone else experiencing problems in cold temperatures?
 

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The 72Ah are quite good. What you should check (and what is essential in your case) is the "cold start" Ampers. How many Ampers does the battery have? 550A? 600A?
Also what is the brand of the battery?
 

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The only issue I had that it when I started my jeep in the cold morning it was jump when I threw it in drive. The dealer made some adjustments and I haven't had any issues.

I just have issues with the Passive Entry system. One day I got it and had a message stating to "Service Passive Entry system". And the yellow Keyless entry light was on on the dash. The dealer flashed it and it seems to have cleared the message. Everything worked fine. It was just the message. Don't know if the cold had anything to do with it.
 

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First of all, I like my Renegade a lot. With studded winter tires the grip and traction is incredible. I have never driven anything that can compare. The comfort is also very good. And it's a fun car to drive.

Now over to the not so good. Jeep must have done a really bad job testing the car in cold climate. When the outside temperature went down to around -15 °C (5 °F) and lower, the car started to show all kinds of fault/alerts like Serv 4WD, Check parking or electronic brake, Stop/start unavailable and Check Engine. In addition, after driving for 40 minutes at moderate speeds and then leaving the car for 24 hours in -25 °C (-13 °F) , the battery didn’t have enough charge to start the car. I checked the battery and it is only 72 Ah which in my opinion is insufficient for climates where the temperature can get down to -30 °C. After a night of charging the battery and a couple of hours with the block heater on, the car started. When the outside temperature went up warmer than -15 °C (5 °F), the messages disappeared. When Check Engine is showing, the car is only front wheel drive.
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I really hope that Jeep has software-updates to fix these issues, but I fear that these low temperature problems are unknown to Jeep and that my car will not be fixed this winter…

Anyone else experiencing problems in cold temperatures?
This sounds at least partly familiar to me. I am driving a 4WD Limited 2.0 diesel with 9-speed A/T. There were no additional warning lights on the dash during the first few weeks, but as soon as a stand-by heater (or whatever you want to call it) was installed, the problems started. This was when the ambient temperature started go below 0 °C.

After the installation I let the heater warm up the engine and the compartment for about 20 to 25 minutes depending on the outside temperature. This led - and still leads - to the loss of 4WD and the start/stop function. Of course, also the "4WD Low" is unavailable. I have made complaints about this both to the dealer of the heater (Eberspächer) and Jeep. So far, no results.

What I did was to reduce the pre-heating time to 15 minutes, which made the "check engine" light disappear, not immediately, but after a while. If I let the heater run longer than that, the light comes back. Fifteen minutes is enough for temperatures not below -10 °C, but more time is needed when it gets colder.

I know that that Eberspächer dealer has contacted the factory (and the one of Webasto as well). This has been under construction now since October, and still I do not know if this going to work or not. The Jeep dealer told me that they have stopped installing the fuel-burning stand-by heaters for the moment.

I have been tend to believe that this problem is caused by a temperature difference between two or more sensors, and that the installation of the heater is the main reason. However, after having read what Arild wrote, this may not be case at all. Arild: does your Jeep have any extra heaters?

Why I bought this stand-by heater? This winter has been no exception: it has been below -10 °C since early January, even -28 °C on a couple of days even around Helsinki. My Renegade has a diesel engine, and starting it without pre-heating at temperatures below -20 °C does sound pretty brutal. Also, it is not possible to use an electric heater everywhere we drive.

I agree with Arild: driving Renegade is pure fun, even though the diesel version seems to have has less traction when it gets cold... However, it runs very well also with FWD, and keeps its driver and passengers warm. Still I really hope FCA can solve this issue rather sooner than later.
 

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For the diesels...could it be related to the fuel gelling up in cold temperatures? When I worked at a diesel truck shop we used to get plugged fuel filters all the time when it got especially cold out. It usually caused starting problems.
 

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The issues mentioned above in this thread have their origins in programming. They are not related to fuel.

Diesel fuel can turn into gel - that's very true. This can be solved by using proper fuel for low temperatures. For us, winter quality diesel fuel is commonly available at this time of the year. In the northern-most part of the country you can fill your tank with an arctic quality diesel fuel. Both of these give a bit less power than the regular fuel, but they remain flowing, and that's the point.
 

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Today - and actually from last Saturday onwards - ambient temperature has been about -2 °C. There has been no need for pre-heating for more than 15 minutes or not even that much. After driving a few kilometres the "check engine" warning turned off, and the 4WD is usable again, so is the start/stop function.
 

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Kutale15, I find it very interesting that you have a fuel-powered heater. I remember those from living in Germany in the '80s. They were popular with taxis and trucks. I have never seen one of those in the US, but they may exist. We usually use only electric plug-in heaters, either permanently installed block and or transmission heaters, or external heating pads that can be attached to oil and transmission pads. Obviously, the integrated fuel powered heater is the most useful heater, but it's also complicated and expensive in comparison.
 

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lamont, these gadgets (= fuel-powered heaters) have become more and more popular while the modern engines produce so little excess heat to be transferred to the passenger compartment. Another reason is, of course, that they give a bit more freedom in where to park your vehicle and still have it nicely warmed up in the next morning. Especially they are quite common with the new diesel-powered vehicles and can be seen as a standard equipment. I agree anyway: complicated and expensive they surely are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
This sounds at least partly familiar to me. I am driving a 4WD Limited 2.0 diesel with 9-speed A/T. There were no additional warning lights on the dash during the first few weeks, but as soon as a stand-by heater (or whatever you want to call it) was installed, the problems started. This was when the ambient temperature started go below 0 °C.


After the installation I let the heater warm up the engine and the compartment for about 20 to 25 minutes depending on the outside temperature. This led - and still leads - to the loss of 4WD and the start/stop function. Of course, also the "4WD Low" is unavailable. I have made complaints about this both to the dealer of the heater (Eberspächer) and Jeep. So far, no results.

What I did was to reduce the pre-heating time to 15 minutes, which made the "check engine" light disappear, not immediately, but after a while. If I let the heater run longer than that, the light comes back. Fifteen minutes is enough for temperatures not below -10 °C, but more time is needed when it gets colder.


I know that that Eberspächer dealer has contacted the factory (and the one of Webasto as well). This has been under construction now since October, and still I do not know if this going to work or not. The Jeep dealer told me that they have stopped installing the fuel-burning stand-by heaters for the moment.


I have been tend to believe that this problem is caused by a temperature difference between two or more sensors, and that the installation of the heater is the main reason. However, after having read what Arild wrote, this may not be case at all. Arild: does your Jeep have any extra heaters?


Why I bought this stand-by heater? This winter has been no exception: it has been below -10 °C since early January, even -28 °C on a couple of days even around Helsinki. My Renegade has a diesel engine, and starting it without pre-heating at temperatures below -20 °C does sound pretty brutal. Also, it is not possible to use an electric heater everywhere we drive.


I agree with Arild: driving Renegade is pure fun, even though the diesel version seems to have has less traction when it gets cold... However, it runs very well also with FWD, and keeps its driver and passengers warm. Still I really hope FCA can solve this issue rather sooner than later.


It's interesting to hear that you also experience comparable issues with Check engine etc in cold temperatures.


I thought my Renegade had a block heater that preheats the coolant, but I just checked and apparently I have an electric "stick on" heaters that preheats the engine oil. I have used it since the temperature started to be around 0 °C. When the temperature was only a few degrees below zero there was no problem with alerts or systems malfunctioning on the car. I also started the car a few times in temperatures below -15 without any problems, although always with the heater preheating the engine oil for a couple of hours. But then I started the car one evening in -17 °C and check engine appeared. The next day the temperature stayed below -15 °C and I used the heater before starting the car but check engine was still on. One day later the check engine message disappeared. The temperature was still below -15 °C. I still got stop/start unavailable and check parking brake, but not check engine. 5-6 days later check engine came back. I have contacted the dealer and they have had the car since Tuesday last week.


My theory is that it's a problem for the diesel engine Renegades (and maybe only for cars with an automatic) and is only related to low temperatures (maybe around -15 °C and lower) and not linked to heaters. Like you I think it is one or more sensors acting up. Maybe the sensor's fault tolerance interval is to narrow in cold temperatures? Whatever it is, my fear is that only a few 2.0 diesel Renegades are being driving in these cold temperatures and therefore Jeep may not be aware and it could take a long time for this to be fixed.
 

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Thanks, Arild. I am now quite convinced that this is about the interoperability of a couple of thermal sensors. Somehow the system does not accept any excess heat coming from outside, no matter if it is produced by electricity or by fuel. I am pretty sure that this should be an easy thing to fix: you only need to know what to fix! Of course, we can always wait that the climate change takes away the low Nordic temperatures, but this may need so many years that not even Jeeps last that long... I'll talk to my Jeep dealer, once again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I'll talk to my Jeep dealer, once again.
Kutale15, please keep me posted on any progress you make. My dealer doesn't have a clue. They just ereased the error codes and gave me the car back saying "Let's hope it will be a mild winter this year"...

My service 4WD light came on around 27 degrees F (-2.7C), once I got gas and turned the Jeep off/on it went away. :/ Just putting in my experience so far! We've had a mild winter.
Jessica, I also got the Serv 4WD in the beginning of winter. A restart later and is was gone untill the temperature went down to -15 °C. But if your car is a petrol car then you will hopefully not experience the problems I and Kutale15 are having.
 

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Anyone else experiencing problems in cold temperatures?
Not that big of an issue, but the tire pressure sensors seem to be more sensitive in cold weather. It warns me that tires are low even when they're only a little low because they're cold.
 

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Arild (and others as well): as it seems, Renegade's internal intelligence does not like any heat coming from the outside when the engine is not running, at least this is how I see it.

The distributor here (FCA Finland) is not willing to believe and fix this. I very much doubt that they have informed the tech guys of the manufacturer. However, they were kind enough to tell me that they had received some information from Webasto GmbH (the heater supplier) saying it is possible to add an extra heat sensor and to connect it to the vehicle's control system through a relay. What kind of relay and sensor, where and how - well, I don't know. I'll ask the shop who installed my heater in the first place.

This might be helpful in your problem, too. I'll keep you informed as soon as I have something more to tell about this.
 
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