Jeep Renegade Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The stickers on the door say 35 PSI cold. The tires themself say max PSI 44. Should they be at 35?

I've only had the Jeep 3 days and noticed they were high. I read somewhere that tires can be overflated for delivery. The info center said all 4 were at 48, but this was during a 30 minute commute. I leaked them all to 42-43 while they were still warm. I'll check in the morning while they're cold, just want to make sure they're correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Always go by what's on the tire, but remember that the tire will give you "max" inflation so you can tweak this to fit your needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Yes.... They posted else ware on the forum that most people's tires were overinflated due to delivery. Mine were all at 48 when I picked it up yesterday, & had the dealership drop them all to 35 before we left.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,600 Posts
Mine were at max on delivery. I set mine at 38, and it's decent. The real answer is pick something between what is one the door and max sidewall pressure that you find the most comfortable and doesn't cause your tires to wear oddly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have them down to 35-38. They go up and down, but closer to 38 most of the time. I ordered a digital tire gauge to help verify the results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
It is always vehicle spec not tire spec. To over inflate will usually wear out in the center and ride bouncy. A couple lbs over the # in the door jam is good. The goodyears already ride like doodoo don't make it harder!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
It is always vehicle spec not tire spec. To over inflate will usually wear out in the center and ride bouncy. A couple lbs over the # in the door jam is good. The goodyears already ride like doodoo don't make it harder!
Since anyone can put any tire on any vehicle, the tire spec is what you go by, not the vehicle spec. If for some reason someone would/could put an LT or even a class D or E, these tires usually require more pressure, etc.
Again, always follow the tire spec, since the vehicle has no idea what tire you have installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,624 Posts
Remember that the psi stamped on the tire itself is the maximum pressure allowed for the tire, not necessarily the pressure you should run in the tire every day. Inflating to maximum pressure while cold will result in over-inflation of 2 to 3 psi once the tire heats up from normal driving.

Over inflation can cause several problems including poor wear characteristics, possible tire damage (cord separation under the tread), poor ride, and possible handling problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Rufus. The tyre has no idea of the weight of the vehicle.
The pressure marked on the tyre is a maximum pressure not a recommended one.
Yes, I stated that 6 or 8 posts ago. All tires will give you the MAX pressure.
It's up to the user to tweak that to their comfort or driving conditions.
But to decide on those pressures, you don't look at the door frame of the vehicle, you look at the tire. Some tires will be max at 32psi, some at 44psi, etc. The vehicle certainly doesn't know what tire the users puts on.
LT's or load tires will be 60 or even 80psi. If anyone chose to change tires to anything other than stock, then looking at the door frame could get them killed.
I can only assume that even with the stock tires, European models may have different tires than US models....TH's may have different tires than the Sport models, etc. LOOK AT THE TIRE and tweak those pressures to suit your tastes.

We hired a new truck driver years ago and one day he decided to lower the tire pressures in our company delivery vehicle to 32psi because that's what he "thought" all tires were supposed to be. The tires on our company vehicle were class D which maxed at 80psi. LOOK AT THE TIRE!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,612 Posts
Yes, I stated that 6 or 8 posts ago. All tires will give you the MAX pressure.
It's up to the user to tweak that to their comfort or driving conditions.
But to decide on those pressures, you don't look at the door frame of the vehicle, you look at the tire. Some tires will be max at 32psi, some at 44psi, etc. The vehicle certainly doesn't know what tire the users puts on.
LT's or load tires will be 60 or even 80psi. If anyone chose to change tires to anything other than stock, then looking at the door frame could get them killed.
I can only assume that even with the stock tires, European models may have different tires than US models....TH's may have different tires than the Sport models, etc. LOOK AT THE TIRE and tweak those pressures to suit your tastes.

We hired a new truck driver years ago and one day he decided to lower the tire pressures in our company delivery vehicle to 32psi because that's what he "thought" all tires were supposed to be. The tires on our company vehicle were class D which maxed at 80psi. LOOK AT THE TIRE!!
The renegade is a car not a truck.
Do you really think that car manufactures would put these figures on their cars if they were not correct? They would leave themselves open to law suits. I run mine a couple of pound below the recommended for comfort. I don't care what the tyre says as long as I don't exceed it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
The renegade is a car not a truck.
Do you really think that car manufactures would put these figures on their cars if they were not correct? They would leave themselves open to law suits. I run mine a couple of pound below the recommended for comfort. I don't care what the tyre says as long as I don't exceed it.
A very dangerous and incorrect way of thinking... I promise you.
We already have several users changing their tires on the Reney. Depending on what make or model, or if they are "car" tires or "LT" tires, etc, the recommended pressures will vary greatly. How do you know what pressures to run these new tires at????
No disrespect syzygy, but you obviously know little about tires. You can buy the same size tire in a multitude of types, and pressures for each type will vary.
At one point I had two different sets of tires on my Astro...the fronts were max 32psi, while the rears were 44psi. Neither were LTs which could easily be 60psi. The door frame of the vehicle certain has no idea what tire I'm running and why. THAT IS WHY THEY PUT THE PRESSURES ON THE TIRES.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,612 Posts
A very dangerous and incorrect way of thinking... I promise you.
We already have several users changing their tires on the Reney. Depending on what make or model, or if they are "car" tires or "LT" tires, etc, the recommended pressures will vary greatly. How do you know what pressures to run these new tires at????
No disrespect syzygy, but you obviously know little about tires. You can buy the same size tire in a multitude of types, and pressures for each type will vary.
At one point I had two different sets of tires on my Astro...the fronts were max 32psi, while the rears were 44psi. Neither were LTs which could easily be 60psi. The door frame of the vehicle certain has no idea what tire I'm running and why. THAT IS WHY THEY PUT THE PRESSURES ON THE TIRES.
I believe the op was asking about the tyres that came with the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
My Limited came with the tires at 44 psi. I took them down to 38. I suspect that they ship the cars with the higher pressure in the tires so that the tires will remain round and prevent (temporary or permanent) flat spots from the car sitting to long without being moved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
In Europe it is easier since You cannot use a tyre different from what approved by car manufacturer for that model and version (size has to be the same, load index and speed index equal or better). You can use any tyre but it must have the car manufacturer specifications (or better).
Using the original size tyres pressure should always be the one in the tyre placard, technical sheet, ... since are the pressures for which car was designed and tuned.

If your car was delivered by dealer with 44 psi it means that the dealer didn't make his job right not doing all inspection before delivery.

Reading the owners manual (U.S. manual) one can find the needed informations even if sometimes disperded in several chapters.
"...
Tire Inflation Pressures
The proper cold tire inflation pressure is listed on the driver’s side B-Pillar or rear edge of the driver’s side door.
..."
note: for the original specification tyres.

"...
WARNING!
Improperly inflated tires are dangerous and can cause collisions.
• Under-inflation increases tire flexing and can result in overheating and tire failure.
• Over-inflation reduces a tire’s ability to cushion shock. Objects on the road and chuckholes can cause damage that result in tire failure.
• Overinflated or under-inflated tires can affect vehicle handling and can fail suddenly, resulting in loss of vehicle control.
• Unequal tire pressures can cause steering problems. You could lose control of your vehicle.
• Unequal tire pressures from one side of the vehicle to the other can cause the vehicle to drift to the right or left.
Always drive with each tire inflated to the recommended cold tire inflation pressure.
..."
"...
WARNING!
Do not use a tire, wheel size or rating other than that specified for your vehicle. Some combinations of unapproved tires and wheels may change suspension dimensions and performance characteristics, resulting in changes to steering, handling, and braking of your vehicle. This can cause unpredictable handling and stress to steering and suspension components. You could lose control and have a collision resulting in serious injury or death. Use only the tire and wheel sizes with load ratings approved for your vehicle.
Never use a tire with a smaller load index or capacity, other than what was originally equipped on your vehicle. Using a tire with a smaller load index could result in tire overloading and failure. You could lose control and have a collision.
• Failure to equip your vehicle with tires having adequate speed capability can result in sudden tire failure and loss of vehicle control.
..."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
The stickers on the door say 35 PSI cold. The tires themself say max PSI 44. Should they be at 35?
The sticker says 35 cold right? So do this, park the car in the shade, then at night go out there and check the pressure. Fill to 35 psi.

They specify "cold" because tire pressure will increase as: ambient temperature increase, as heat is being transferred from brakes to wheels to tire and through friction against the pavement as you drive.

So best practice is to start with a consistent baseline—when the tire is cold.

The max rating is simply an indicator of the max pressure you could use without FCA engineers and lawyers becoming uncomfortable. There is really no need to fill to max, unless you are transporting heavy loads... even then, you are probably overthinking things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Yep, 35 cold.

I have mine at 38 cold. As ambient temperatures drop (heading into fall) tires lose about 1psi for every 10 degrees the outside temperature drops. So, I'm at 38 because I don't want to fiddle with them for a while.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top