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I'd say the Renegade did really good when going up those inclines, at least when it comes to most buying this... they won't come across anything nearly as extreme as that.
 

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So I am guessing that the Blizzak tires do not come standard on the Renegade. Kinda makes the whole test a bit pointless as the tires have a big impact on how the vehicles do overall.
 

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So I am guessing that the Blizzak tires do not come standard on the Renegade. Kinda makes the whole test a bit pointless as the tires have a big impact on how the vehicles do overall.
Not pointless at all. Even some super cheap entry level tire will serve you well in winter conditions. Dislodge the concern for make and model of tire from your mind.
 

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Not pointless at all. Even some super cheap entry level tire will serve you well in winter conditions. Dislodge the concern for make and model of tire from your mind.

Sorry, but no.

The difference between a car designed poorly for the snow on cheap all season tires and on snow tires is HUGE. Snow tires make a huge difference in snow, and TFL's video of all the mopar offerings should be considered with that in mind.

If they are wearing blizzaks, that is not the performance you will get on stock OEM rubber, end of story.
 

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So why is it that the Wrangler was able to make it up that incline in one smooth trip while the Renegade wasn't? I believe they were both in 4WD Low and had Blizzak tires on.

Is it because the Wrangler's front and rear axles were turning together and the Renegade's "brain" was trying to figure out which wheel had traction and which didn't and was shifting power back and forth to the wheel with the most traction?

Is this just a case where a locking differential is superior to an intelligent AWD / 4WD system?
 

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. . . Snow tires make a huge difference in snow, . . .
.........^^^^^^^^^
..............This!

Purpose use snow tires absolutely make a difference. Sure the Wrangler with limited slip differentials will outperform a vehicle with brake lock differentials (like the Renegade).

The car I'm driving today (in the snow) has four studded snow tires. It is a rear wheel drive, heavy car with more than enough horsepower and I can go on any snowy/icy road where many with all-season tires cannot. This includes some AWD cars with all season tires. It does help that my car has a limited slip differential and the 39 winters of driving experience I have helps a lot too.
 

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In order of what influences the winter driving:

1. Driver's winter driving experience
2. Type of tires (snow tires vs all season)
3. Vehicle

I'd rather ride as a passenger in a 2wd vehicle with all season tires and an experienced winter driver as opposed to a 4wd vehicle in blizzaks and someone who has never driven in snow.
 

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.........^^^^^^^^^
..............This!

Purpose use snow tires absolutely make a difference. Sure the Wrangler with limited slip differentials will outperform a vehicle with brake lock differentials (like the Renegade).

The car I'm driving today (in the snow) has four studded snow tires. It is a rear wheel drive, heavy car with more than enough horsepower and I can go on any snowy/icy road where many with all-season tires cannot. This includes some AWD cars with all season tires. It does help that my car has a limited slip differential and the 39 winters of driving experience I have helps a lot too.
So your running 4 studded snow tires ? Your info says you are in eastern pa. Studded tires are illegal in pa so maybe you can explain more !
 

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So your running 4 studded snow tires ? Your info says you are in eastern pa. Studded tires are illegal in pa so maybe you can explain more !
Yes, four studded snow tires. My work is at the top of a hill with a 1 mile, 9% grade. I need to be sure I can get up and then back down without slipping and sliding.

My car can safely drive on any snowy/icy road with up to about 6 inches or so of unplowed snow on the road. More snow again today and I had no trouble getting in to work (they didn't even plow/salt the "mountain" road yet).

If I trade my 2009 in for the Renegade, you can bet that I will purchase four snow tires (with dedicated wheels) for it too. I won't get the niosy studs though since the Renegade has the AWD system.

I won't run all-season tires in snowy weather.
 

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.........^^^^^^^^^
..............This!

The car I'm driving today (in the snow) has four studded snow tires.
Not to try to argue the point...(seems people here can get a bit touchy :) but STEEL STUDDED tires and MUD/SNOW and ALL WEATHER and ALL SEASON and YADA YADA YADA TIRES... as well as other variations all can be and are seemingly very different animals.

For example, steel studded tires actually have steel studs embedded into the tread in an attempt to "mimic" the performance of tire chains. To my knowledge other variants do not, (unless installed as an option?) but rather use compounds, tread patterns, sidewall characteristics, etc.. to try and achieve good results in snowy/icy conditions.

Apples to Apples I would be hard pressed to reasonably try to compare any "steel studded" tire with any other tire that does not have the benefit of "steel studs" for snowy and icy conditions, regardless of the vehicle... IMHO

Anyone know differently??
 

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Purpose use winter tires will always work better in the snow and on ice than all-season tires even without studs. I got studs in my winter tires because of the 9% grade I have to go up (and down) every weekday.
 

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Found yet another TFL video that shows off the Renegade in wintery conditions. The video is a continuation of TFL's time in Montreal, Quebec on the winter test track. The video takes a look at the Renegade's terrain management system that has modes for "Auto, Snow, Sand, Mud, and Rock." The Trailhawk model lets you lock the differential and go into 4WD low gear for slow speed off-roading.

 
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