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So this is the forth car I've owned and have never come across or experienced this previously but during the past month I've had to experience on numerous occasions a horrible loud screeching noise which can only be described as metal grinding against metal.. horrid!
The first time I had to call assist out as I didn't have a clue what was going on and now I do... basically stones keep getting caught between the disc and brake pad and hence the loud scary noise. I know how to get them out now - even though I look like muppet driving back and forth slamming the brakes on to dislodge it (advise given to me by Jeep assist).
So, my question is if any one else has experienced this? As I'm surprised that with a car that's meant to be for off roading (I have a trailhawk) that this thing keeps happening? The whole purpose I bought the car was because of where I live... theres rocks & stones everywhere! and its the only car that I've had to do this! Sounds like a design flaw!
I have it booked in with Jeep in a weeks time for them to have a look at the wheels.... and some other problems.....*sigh* maybe I just have extremely bad luck with cars :(
 

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humm thats not good. have you had the dealer look at it? Maybe the brake pads are not installed correctly.
 

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I think its just bad luck friend. I had this happen on a local small trail with a Honda Civic. I think its just how brake systems in general are designed. There are lots of open areas down there for small stones to get lodged into. This also happened just 3 weeks ago in my Trailhawk on the same trail. Again, just bad luck I think.

I don't think that the advise the Assist guy gave you is the best advise though. In my opinion (not a professional), if the stone doesn't dislodge and you are sitting there slamming on your brakes, you might cause more damage than you avoid.

The way I resolved the problem both times it happened to me is to find the problem wheel, then jack up the car and remove the wheel. You just have to find a decently flat area for you to jack up the car, and make sure you put your e-brake on. With the car slightly jacked up and the wheel removed, you can look on the underside of the brakes and see where the stone is lodged. In my case, it was between the rotor and a thin metal plate located behind the rotor. You can just slightly move that metal plate back and the stone just falls out. Replace the tire and you are good to go.

I know it might be a bit more time consuming, but I feel like this is safer than slamming on the brakes knowing there is a stone in there. I have a feeling you can put some pretty decent grooves into your rotors by slamming on the brakes.

I hope this was helpful!
 

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I had the crazy loud metal on metal sound happen once. Pulled over to try and figure out what was wrong. Kept driving, and within a few minutes it was gone. I figured it was a small stone that caused the noise. Haven't had it happen again.
 

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My wife had taken the Renegade out and had a brake issue which forced her to park the car up and phone me. Apparently there was a terrible squealing from the rear left and the car felt like the brake had seized. When I got there I had to back the car out of the space she had pulled into and then couldn't detect a problem, audible or mechanical, but I did notice a score in the disc that isn't in the rh disc. My conclusion - stone or other object caught between pad and disc.
 

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are you guys trying to say this is a common problem with vehicles??? I have been driving for years on dirt roads and never had this happen in any vehicle nor have I heard this happening on family or friends vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've got it booked into Jeep next Tuesday for them to take a look at it.... as its happened so many times and they think its even strange for it to happen so many times.
It's either yes there's a problem or I am just cursed when it comes to cars - will let you know!
 

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I think its just bad luck friend. I had this happen on a local small trail with a Honda Civic. I think its just how brake systems in general are designed. There are lots of open areas down there for small stones to get lodged into. This also happened just 3 weeks ago in my Trailhawk on the same trail. Again, just bad luck I think.

I don't think that the advise the Assist guy gave you is the best advise though. In my opinion (not a professional), if the stone doesn't dislodge and you are sitting there slamming on your brakes, you might cause more damage than you avoid.

The way I resolved the problem both times it happened to me is to find the problem wheel, then jack up the car and remove the wheel. You just have to find a decently flat area for you to jack up the car, and make sure you put your e-brake on. With the car slightly jacked up and the wheel removed, you can look on the underside of the brakes and see where the stone is lodged. In my case, it was between the rotor and a thin metal plate located behind the rotor. You can just slightly move that metal plate back and the stone just falls out. Replace the tire and you are good to go.

I know it might be a bit more time consuming, but I feel like this is safer than slamming on the brakes knowing there is a stone in there. I have a feeling you can put some pretty decent grooves into your rotors by slamming on the brakes.

I hope this was helpful!

Thank you for the good advise! I will keep this in mind... but I have to admit I unfortunately haven't acquired the skill of removing wheels.... yet! :s
 

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Just had a look at the Renegade's braking system and I looks like it's the Fiats system of only having one brake piston to work the pads..

So when you brake pads hits the disk ( rotor ) I relies on the slide system pulling the other pad to the disk ( rotor ) Works well if the slid mechanism is free and lubricated but does tend to cease up after a while ..

Shouldn't be a problem on a new car but can lead to a small gap between on of the pads enough for a small stone or grit getting in ..

We used copper slip to lubricate the slide mechanism which is a heat resistant grease ..

I only had a visual look but that's what it looks like.. we had lots of problems with seized brakes with this system .. if they were not looked at regularly ..

i hope this helps .. I could be wrong ..
 

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are you guys trying to say this is a common problem with vehicles??? I have been driving for years on dirt roads and never had this happen in any vehicle nor have I heard this happening on family or friends vehicles.
I don't think its a common problem on vehicles, I think its just bad luck. There are perhaps some vehicles which are more susceptible to this than others, but if you look at any car with a rotor brake, not a drum brake, the whole brake system is exposed and a perfectly sized stone could very easily get lodged up there.

Perhaps you've been lucky. I've only driven on dirt roads perhaps 10-15 times and its happened to me twice already, 2 different cars. Sure is an annoying problem.
 

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I did some googling on this and yes it does seem to happen but in theory should not be common since the pads should be almost touching the disks at all times. The space being so small that almost nothing but water should ever get between the 2 solid objects.
 

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Clearance between rotor and pad is minimal. Think less than paperthin. Think of it this way, when you brake the pad is pushed against the rotor. When you get off the brake, the brake pad is not retracted, but simply clears the rotor due to friction. Actually, a disc brakes drags a tiny bit due to the brake pad ever so slightly contacting the rotor. You can easily confirm that by spinning the wheel on a jacked-up car. You will hear a faint scratchy noise. That is the pad dragging over the rotor. So there just isn't room for pebbles to get in between pad and rotor. If there is anything more than the slightest clearance between pad an rotor, something is wrong.

Pebbles could however easily get stuck between the brake heat shield (if so equipped) or other brake parts and bounce merrily around for a prolonged periods.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
...bit of a delay on the update.. sorry! but Jeep found nothing wrong and said it was down to my bad luck... *sigh*
I have to drive up and down dirt roads to get to and from home everyday so I guess my chances of this happening to me is more likely!.... guess I'm still gonna keep the car then ;)
 

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I've had a lot of squeaking on my trailhawk. Dealer said it was "brake dust". Didn't even know what to say to that. I drive fairly regularly on dirt/dusty roads and it's annoying, that's for sure.
 

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So this is the forth car I've owned and have never come across or experienced this previously but during the past month I've had to experience on numerous occasions a horrible loud screeching noise which can only be described as metal grinding against metal.. horrid!
The first time I had to call assist out as I didn't have a clue what was going on and now I do... basically stones keep getting caught between the disc and brake pad and hence the loud scary noise. I know how to get them out now - even though I look like muppet driving back and forth slamming the brakes on to dislodge it (advise given to me by Jeep assist).
So, my question is if any one else has experienced this? As I'm surprised that with a car that's meant to be for off roading (I have a trailhawk) that this thing keeps happening? The whole purpose I bought the car was because of where I live... theres rocks & stones everywhere! and its the only car that I've had to do this! Sounds like a design flaw!
I have it booked in with Jeep in a weeks time for them to have a look at the wheels.... and some other problems.....*sigh* maybe I just have extremely bad luck with cars :(
I bought my Trailhawk a month ago and what you're describing has happened 3 times now on gravel roads. Sounds like the **** thing is going to grind to pieces.... I got the sound recorded today on video and will take it to the dealer to see if there's a fix. Not something I will tolerate in a brand new car....
 

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Freshly planed roads in my entire area and tonight the car made the most disgusting grinding noise at the top of one of the hills. Worse when turning left? But missus says its definitely the driver side rear wheel making the racket. I've tried all sorts to get it out, reversing, slamming on brakes, fast motorway, might go to a tyre place on my way to work tomorrow see if he'll take the wheel off and have a look

Theres no jack in the boot of Renegade? lol


Hoping the tyre place can find the stone.
 

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Just had a look at the Renegade's braking system and I looks like it's the Fiats system of only having one brake piston to work the pads..

So when you brake pads hits the disk ( rotor ) I relies on the slide system pulling the other pad to the disk ( rotor ) Works well if the slid mechanism is free and lubricated but does tend to cease up after a while ..
Single piston calipers are a very common type of disc brake system on cars. Generally they work just fine (BTW, I usually use a silicon-based brake grease for the slides).

I'm wondering if the Renegades come with the type of brake pads that are recessed on the edges--this would form a tapered space perfect for catching small stones or debris (I've often wondered why some pads are made this way?). If this is the case, changing to a square-shouldered pad might help.
 

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Having examined the brakes on my TH the rear calipers are set closer to the hub than on the front. Its certainly close enough for a small stone (10cm or so) to get lodged into there and scrape. It should be pretty obvious if one has done it as there would be scrape marks on the hub.

Left nearside rear caliper assembly from top

Same from side - Pads look square edged to me

Offside rear assembly - note the small gap between hub and metal caliper, looks idea for a stone to lodge

The gap at the front, between calipers and hub is much larger. This is a shot of the pad, seems to have square edge (on this pad anyway)


The Hawks wheels do have large openings to allow stones to jump in from the outside, if your hooning down a stone covered track as well of course as they can make it inside as theres no plate there to prevent them jumping inside the wheel.
 

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Great pics and explanation Ridders!

Local tyre place couldn't sort it, so booked in at Jeep to investigate. Brand new Renegade will they charge for the removal of wheel/disc to fix?
 
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