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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently found out (thanks evrafter) that some models have remote start/push start while other models have regular key start switches.

I've always had a key start the vehicle, so I ask, for those that had key starting systems and now have a keyless/push button system.
1-How does it work.
2-Do you like it or dislike it?

TS
 
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I recently found out (thanks evrafter) that some models have remote start/push start while other models have regular key start switches.

I've always had a key start the vehicle, so I ask, for those that had key starting systems and now have a keyless/push button system.
1-How does it work.
2-Do you like it or dislike it?

TS
This is my first keyless entry car. I like it a lot, the key just stays in my pocket all the time, you don't need to do anything to lock or unlock the car either. Very convenient. It took me a little while to figure out the standby modes where you can still use the electronics without the engine running, but it works great overall.
 

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Like aardvark, I've found it to be pretty damned convenient. The key fob never has to come out of my pocket. I walk up to my car, open the door and it recognizes the proximity of my fob so it unlocks upon touching it (not sure if Renegade is equipped like that, but that's how it works on my other car). Not only that, but as soon as I'm next to the car, it recognizes me and turns on the vanity light in the car. Nice touch.


Starting the car is just like with a key, except you're just pushing a button.


The only thing I had to get used to was the audible alert when I would leave my car running and I step outside of the vehicle. It recognized that the fob was exiting the vehicle and it tries to warn you that you might want to leave the fob if someone else is going to be taking the car (like a valet, for example). It's easy to forget since it's always in your pocket. Not a big deal, your car will continue to run without the fob, but it won't be able to start up again without it.


That all said, I'll never go back to a keyed car again. It's damned convenient, and you don't end up with all those scratches around the door lock/ignition. Even if the battery on the fob dies out, there's a manual override, so you'll never be stranded somewhere so long as you have the fob.
 

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It's a very simple system to use and once you get used to it, you won't think twice about just hopping in the car and going.

With the push button start, you also get the True Keyless Enter N' Go system which recognizes when you're about to open the vehicle and unlocks it for you. Also provides a button the outside of the door handle to lock the vehicle with.
 

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This is my first keyless entry car. I like it a lot, the key just stays in my pocket all the time, you don't need to do anything to lock or unlock the car either. Very convenient. It took me a little while to figure out the standby modes where you can still use the electronics without the engine running, but it works great overall.
Pretty much just going to quote this. Putting your hand in the handle to unlock it and but then pressing the handle button to lock it with your hand NOT being behind the handle took a bit of getting used to, but works great now.

I enjoy just having my keys on my person to operate my vehicle by proximity.
 

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A friend recently moved from mid-West to Santa Barbara. Drove one of his vehicles and had his Prius shipped to LA and delivered to SB. He said, "That's not my car". The driver had mistakenly driven his boss's Prius, which had its proximity key in the glove box, thinking he was driving the customer's Prius with the proximity key the driver had left in his own pocket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A friend recently moved from mid-West to Santa Barbara. Drove one of his vehicles and had his Prius shipped to LA and delivered to SB. He said, "That's not my car". The driver had mistakenly driven his boss's Prius, which had its proximity key in the glove box, thinking he was driving the customer's Prius with the proximity key the driver had left in his own pocket.
lol Wow.

Note to self: Do not leave proximity key in car.

TS
 
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I recently found out (thanks evrafter) that some models have remote start/push start while other models have regular key start switches.

I've always had a key start the vehicle, so I ask, for those that had key starting systems and now have a keyless/push button system.
1-How does it work.
2-Do you like it or dislike it?

TS
I love it. Almost all my vehicles have had this. I find jeeps to be a little sensitive, I mostly keep my keys in my work bag and it almost instantly unlocks the car. When I start my car a block away with the key fob it's even more sensitive almost as if the fob is directly by the door. It's nothing to hate it's extremely convenient just my 2cents on it
 

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What is the big deal with a key, no EMP issues.
If you get enough EMP to bother your remote, don't worry, all your electronics will be fried and you don't need to worry about starting anyway ?
 

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If you get enough EMP to bother your remote, don't worry, all your electronics will be fried and you don't need to worry about starting anyway ��
I did not mean on a mass scale like typically thought. Some work in industrial/lab environments where inductive fields can damage electronics. Never had a problem with a transponder key, but cell phones can be affected. I figure the more complex electronics in the advanced fob might be vulnerable.
 

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I've only had mine for a week...but I love it for getting in the car and starting it (wish the start button was on the dash and not "hidden" behind the wheel because I still have to the "lean over looking for keyhole" thing). Locking it...seems a bit finicky. Like sometimes I have to push the button a couple times. And I turned off the honk horn when locking door option (I live in a complex and find it rude to be honking my horn at 2am when I get home) and it kinda makes me not trust that it's really locked. Ha ha ha.
 

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Can these be installed later?

If I bought a Renegade that does not have the push to start / remote start system, will it be possible to have these features installed at a later time?
 

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I did not mean on a mass scale like typically thought. Some work in industrial/lab environments where inductive fields can damage electronics. Never had a problem with a transponder key, but cell phones can be affected. I figure the more complex electronics in the advanced fob might be vulnerable.
I guess that could pose a problem, but wouldn't work environments like that require you to remove things like phones, keys, watches, etc before entering them?
 

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I guess that could pose a problem, but wouldn't work environments like that require you to remove things like phones, keys, watches, etc before entering them?
Yes, some of those items. Keys and watches were generally excluded in my experience, but more complex devices (phones/PDAs,some medical devices) were affected. Not a big deal, just something else to lock up.
 

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Yes, some of those items. Keys and watches were generally excluded in my experience, but more complex devices (phones/PDAs,some medical devices) were affected. Not a big deal, just something else to lock up.
Interesting! I wonder how robust the LF electronics are in the passive keyless entry devices to withstand prolonged exposure to such environments.
 

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Interesting! I wonder how robust the LF electronics are in the passive keyless entry devices to withstand prolonged exposure to such environments.
Probably right not to worry, these environments are specialized and probably only .001% of the population will ever have to worry about it. I suspect medical environments pose similar concerns (MRI?).
 
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