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hi my 2017 renegade trail edition with factory tow package is rated to only tow 2,000. Can i somehow increase that? Thw small camp trailers I am looking at are 2500 to 3000 thanks geoloz
 

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Same as @bfloyd4445 said, towing capacity is limited by the engine and the vehicles structural frame. Neither of which are easy upgrades.
 

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Same as @bfloyd4445 said, towing capacity is limited by the engine and the vehicles structural frame. Neither of which are easy upgrades.
That's why i also own a Ford F250 which is rated to practically tow a house.
That said you can still tow with your rene TH but keep it small for safety. Tent trailers are lite, have all the amenities and won't strain your drive train and can be lots of fun. The little Rene TH is a great little car and extremely capable for its size. I used to tow a 16 foot travel trailer with my Jeep CJ5 without issues and it was not rated to tow. Trouble is with a vehicle with such a short wheel base it will tend to be ruled by the trailer and its no fun to have the trailer making your car go in a direction you don't want. My F250 has electronics built in that control the brakes of the trailer to compensate automatically without the driver doing anything when things get out of whack and jeep does not offer this level if technology in fact no one does yet except for Ford.
 

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Nope!

and enjoy the forum!

Search is your friend!
 

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Even with a Brake Controller installed it would be unsafe.

In my opinion, the Renegade just doesn't make enough power to pull that much weight.
 

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Even with a Brake Controller installed it would be unsafe.

In my opinion, the Renegade just doesn't make enough power to pull that much weight.
Not brake controller, i was referring to a computer based system that controls both the vehicle and trailer including the brakes. These integrated systems that Ford came out with way way back in2002 as an option and since then they have gotten much more sophisticated each year. The latest can even back the trailer up for you.
Power means nothing tiny engines can pull huge weights the main issue is the wheelbase, and design limitations of the drive train. The Rene was not engineered with towing in mind. The F 150 with the 2.7L can tow 9,000 pounds and also carry an additional 2,500 pounds in payload. The rene trailhawk has a 2.4L engine thats on;y .3L smaller than the Ford. The Ford is designed for towing the Rene is not, it is designed to get into tight places. When you purchase a vehicle you must list the must have criteria then find the vehicles that meet those criteria and choose one.
I'm not trying to sell Fords they are just a good example as they are the leader in the field and all others follow their lead.
 

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hi my 2017 renegade trail edition with factory tow package is rated to only tow 2,000. Can i somehow increase that? Thw small camp trailers I am looking at are 2500 to 3000 thanks geoloz
I had the same issue. I needed to tow a 1900 pound trailer and load combo. My 2020 Renegade Trailhawk would start up a hill at 75 and top the hill at 35. That 2000 pound rating is flat ground, no wind, and no passenger! The fix for me was a trade up. No more Renegade. I bought a 2021 Wrangler Unlimited S w/ Eco-diesel power. 3500lbs tow rating. Limited by the frame, not the moto.
 

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Eh, I once towed a pop up camper with my 1987 Suzuki Samurai with it's massive 1.3 liter carbureted engine . That was...fun. I made it, but the pucker factor was quite high. I was never sure if I was pulling the camper or the camper was pushing me. I sold the camper, cheaper than buying a new vehicle when I only camp once or twice a year...
 

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I had the same issue. I needed to tow a 1900 pound trailer and load combo. My 2020 Renegade Trailhawk would start up a hill at 75 and top the hill at 35. That 2000 pound rating is flat ground, no wind, and no passenger! The fix for me was a trade up. No more Renegade. I bought a 2021 Wrangler Unlimited S w/ Eco-diesel power. 3500lbs tow rating. Limited by the frame, not the moto.
When towing with your rene did you use the paddle shifter to keep your rpm's up over 5,000? My little boat weighs in at abour 2,200 with the trailer and at 55 I have noticed no issues even in the mountains. I am used to towing lots of things up to about 14,000 pounds all over often crossing mountain passes as high as 10,000 feet. I don't tow at 75mph i seldom go over 60 even when towing light loads with my F250 diesel which is rated to tow a small house and contents.
Its all a trade off. If you rarely tow then buy for everyday driving with the capability for occasional towing and save money. Even with my F250 which is designed for towing and the cpu adds the trailer into the abs system so it is very capable at high speed towing. The fact of the matter is high speed towing also means extreme high risk towing and should be avoided. Out west its 55mph max when towing but that limit is ignored most going 65. Every year when the weather changes i see dozens of wrecks because people want to drive 80 no matter what the conditions. I frequently cross the Sierra Nevada mountains and I can predict where the first accident will be based upon the weather report when crossing these mountains. Sometimes they begin at 3,000 feet. People get on the road and it looks clear no traffic so they buzz along at 70 then fly off into a snow bank because of the invisable black ice. If they were going at a speed in tune with the weather they would not have had an accident and would arive at their destination safe happy and warm. When towing the danger is magnified many times over.
 

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bfloyd4445-

I agree with everything you said.

I hate it when I see an inexperienced driver towing an improperly loaded trailer and when it begins to sway, THEY SLOW DOWN !! I scream in my car, "Hit the gas, idiot !!". There should be some sort of training required before you can tow something. The ONLY way to pull a trailer out of a sway is to accelerate, slowing down only makes it worse. Yep, starts swaying more so they slow down more. There should be some sort of training that instructs you on how to load a trailer (prevent/reduce swaying) as well as tow it. Mandatory that you also back it into a spot with wrecking anything.

Amazingly, the only requirements are a drivers license and money to buy a trailer.
 

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bfloyd4445-

I agree with everything you said.

I hate it when I see an inexperienced driver towing an improperly loaded trailer and when it begins to sway, THEY SLOW DOWN !! I scream in my car, "Hit the gas, idiot !!". There should be some sort of training required before you can tow something. The ONLY way to pull a trailer out of a sway is to accelerate, slowing down only makes it worse. Yep, starts swaying more so they slow down more. There should be some sort of training that instructs you on how to load a trailer (prevent/reduce swaying) as well as tow it. Mandatory that you also back it into a spot with wrecking anything.

Amazingly, the only requirements are a drivers license and money to buy a trailer.
I agree. I am against any new laws unless the law requires the removal of at least one old law but a mandatory towing hauling course should be required for all drivers. When California decided to require a behind the wheel motorcycle test before people could get a motorcycle endorsement on their drivers license i volunteered for the course before it was required. I was surprised at how comprehensive it was. The course required a panic stop while on a curve from a specific speed and other manuveurs one would have to use on the streets. The course impressed me and was well thought out tested my skills severly but i passed with 100%. At this time i had already had four years driving motorcycles on the streets, old mule and indian trails. That was maybe 1967
 

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When towing with your rene did you use the paddle shifter to keep your rpm's up over 5,000? My little boat weighs in at abour 2,200 with the trailer and at 55 I have noticed no issues even in the mountains. I am used to towing lots of things up to about 14,000 pounds all over often crossing mountain passes as high as 10,000 feet. I don't tow at 75mph i seldom go over 60 even when towing light loads with my F250 diesel which is rated to tow a small house and contents.
Its all a trade off. If you rarely tow then buy for everyday driving with the capability for occasional towing and save money. Even with my F250 which is designed for towing and the cpu adds the trailer into the abs system so it is very capable at high speed towing. The fact of the matter is high speed towing also means extreme high risk towing and should be avoided. Out west its 55mph max when towing but that limit is ignored most going 65. Every year when the weather changes i see dozens of wrecks because people want to drive 80 no matter what the conditions. I frequently cross the Sierra Nevada mountains and I can predict where the first accident will be based upon the weather report when crossing these mountains. Sometimes they begin at 3,000 feet. People get on the road and it looks clear no traffic so they buzz along at 70 then fly off into a snow bank because of the invisable black ice. If they were going at a speed in tune with the weather they would not have had an accident and would arive at their destination safe happy and warm. When towing the danger is magnified many times over.
First of all, I have towed trailers from a couple hundred pounds to 12,000 pounds thousands of miles behind a motorcycle, a Dodge Cummins diesel, a Ford 7.3 dsl and gas vehicles all at 65 to 70 mph ( occasionally more to pass quickly ) and have never had a sway problem. Except in heavy crosswinds which most of us doing a lot of towing are smart enough to slow down for before it’s an issue. I think Montana and Utah are considered “out west” and most freeway speed limits are 80 and a few areas 75. Two lane state roads in Montana are nearly all 70 mph. I towed an aluminum trailer with a properly tied down side by side from Montana to Mesa AZ with the Rene. Ran straight and true all day at 65 mph on the freeway and yes I did manually shift to keep the rpm up but still ran low on power here and there but was overall pleased with the effort until I hit those long steep climbs on AZ 93. After a few of those slowing to 30 mph and being unsafely passed by everything on the road I started taking the 75 mph run at some of them to try and stay out of people’s way. By the way my properly tied and balanced load NEVER swayed at all even at 75. Not that I wanted to do that, but poking along at 30-35 when traffic is running 70 is inherently dangerous. I have news for you too that poking at 55 on a freeway with a 75 or 80 mph or a two lane with a 70 speed limit can cause some issues too. I spent 4 years in California and have driven most of the Sierras many times via motorcycle. Those are roads that would not support higher speeds partly due to significantly more traffic than Montana. All that BS about black ice and crap. I sure don’t need a driving lesson. I’ve ridden a motorcycle across the Beartooth Pass (10,947ft) in an August Blizzard. Not the smartest thing I’ve ever done but we were following a plow and sand rig and pushed on. Point being that the discussion is about lack of power on long inclines. It was a bit busy keeping up on slow twisty mountain roads but absolutely suffering on a very long steady grade. At the time I bought it I had nothing to tow. Now I do and if I wasn’t towing often in the Rockies or no long distances I might keep the Rene. But I snowbird and the Wrangler will be a much better tow vehicle for me and can be towed 4 down behind my class A. A win win as I have no other down towable.
 

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Z06-

You explained it perfectly when you stated "properly tied down". You did. Most don't. They just load it up as they carry it out, totally disregarding weight distribution. That's why I see trailers swaying ALL the time.

I tow a single axle trailer loaded with a heavy sidecar rig (weighs in at over 800 lbs) with my wife's 2005 Jeep Liberty, which has an astonishing 5,000 lbs tow capacity. The trailer has no brakes so I do go a little slower than others. Since the bike weighs a lot more than the sidecar, I went so far as to stack 25 lb weight plates on posts mounted to the trailer bed to balance out the load properly. When people ask what they're for and I explain, I usually get a head shake and comments like, "Well, aren't you the safety Nazi.".
 

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First of all, I have towed trailers from a couple hundred pounds to 12,000 pounds thousands of miles behind a motorcycle, a Dodge Cummins diesel, a Ford 7.3 dsl and gas vehicles all at 65 to 70 mph ( occasionally more to pass quickly ) and have never had a sway problem. Except in heavy crosswinds which most of us doing a lot of towing are smart enough to slow down for before it’s an issue. I think Montana and Utah are considered “out west” and most freeway speed limits are 80 and a few areas 75. Two lane state roads in Montana are nearly all 70 mph. I towed an aluminum trailer with a properly tied down side by side from Montana to Mesa AZ with the Rene. Ran straight and true all day at 65 mph on the freeway and yes I did manually shift to keep the rpm up but still ran low on power here and there but was overall pleased with the effort until I hit those long steep climbs on AZ 93. After a few of those slowing to 30 mph and being unsafely passed by everything on the road I started taking the 75 mph run at some of them to try and stay out of people’s way. By the way my properly tied and balanced load NEVER swayed at all even at 75. Not that I wanted to do that, but poking along at 30-35 when traffic is running 70 is inherently dangerous. I have news for you too that poking at 55 on a freeway with a 75 or 80 mph or a two lane with a 70 speed limit can cause some issues too. I spent 4 years in California and have driven most of the Sierras many times via motorcycle. Those are roads that would not support higher speeds partly due to significantly more traffic than Montana. All that BS about black ice and crap. I sure don’t need a driving lesson. I’ve ridden a motorcycle across the Beartooth Pass (10,947ft) in an August Blizzard. Not the smartest thing I’ve ever done but we were following a plow and sand rig and pushed on. Point being that the discussion is about lack of power on long inclines. It was a bit busy keeping up on slow twisty mountain roads but absolutely suffering on a very long steady grade. At the time I bought it I had nothing to tow. Now I do and if I wasn’t towing often in the Rockies or no long distances I might keep the Rene. But I snowbird and the Wrangler will be a much better tow vehicle for me and can be towed 4 down behind my class A. A win win as I have no other down towable.
I was a kid when i took the test 19 years old and i could see its value for new motorcycle drivers. As a matter of fact I'm off loading my rene for the same reason it appears you did it has no neutral for flat towing. :)...gonna order a new Bronco but then today i saw a new E wrangler will soon be on the market and i may go that route. I never liked the wrangler having broken in on the CJ's and loved the CJ5 i had with a Meyers steel cab and full glass windows. Yep, your in what i consider the west even if its a far bit east of me....chuckle...Speed limit here is 65 or 70 55 for towing which no one abides by except for me when i am in no hurry. The 450 mile trip i often make takes 6.5 to 8 hours to make depending upon speed and vehicle. The rene requires two or more fuel stops another thing o don't like and in the truck one tank. In the truck i can set the cruise and make the run in one shot I like that unless i have a heavy load then i have to stop once. I've run into the sway issue due to sudden gusts with my short wheel base vehicles like the jeeps never with the F's..I've never owned a class A but have been toying with the idea lately now i have no more boats but two itty bitty ones. The fact is life isn't getting any longer and there are places i want to see yet and don't like leaving my two cats.
 
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