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Could you please post a picture of the ply ratings? Also were you able to sell your tires to the tire shop? Price per tire?

After reading about the Scorpion A/T plus the 225/65R17 is rated as a standard load passenger in America. But has 2 steel plies and a similar load & speed ratings to a C rated LT tire. Maybe number of plies, materials or sidewall thicknesses determines this difference?

I can see the appeal of the Scorpion tires. Light weight for better MPG, quieter on pavement, aggressive tread, good mileage warranty, decent price tire, reputable manufacturer & looks kool, which is half the battle. Brand new to North America, available since early 2018. Seems to be the most well balanced tire for the weekend warrior that will fit a stock renny.

I can attest to the MPG drop of the KO2s from the stock Falkin H/T tires. Which was about 3 avg. mpg at first. Now that I have the pressure of the tires between 50-55psi it's only 1 avg. mpg loss. I already get **** mpg as I live in a metro area with lots of stop and go. Also they are fairly loud on pavement.

So far I have driven about 800 paved miles, 70 miles of fire roads with ease and done a little mudding near Rollins Lake California. KO2s do great in the mud around 30-35 psi.

Neebaum, If you are ever in Sacramento/Tahoe area HMU, there are plenty of scenic trails the trailhawk is perfect for.
I forgot to mention that I was able to sell my tires to America's Tire. They gave me $50 per tire which I expected since that's what you got initially. Fortunately for me I didn't have to wait so unfortunately that meant I didn't get any extra discount on the trade in as you did. Thanks for the recommending AT. It helped lower my out of pocket cost.
 

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Yes I know the two have different rim sizes. For comparison, it's the only load range C light truck tire were the overall tire height and width are the same, along with near identical speed and weight load capacity as the Pirelli I currently know of. That's why I'm wondering how many plies the Scorpion AT has. And if the plies are nylon, polyester cord along with the 2 steel plies Pirelli makes a point of stating in each write up I have read on the tire. Because nothing says f ing tough in America like steel.

Looking in the size description of your attached picture, the LT in front of the 265/70R17 means it is a light truck tire. The 225/65R17 Pirelli does not have this designation where the KO2 does have LT in front of the tire size. Which can be seen in the top view comparison photo you posted of the KO2 and Scorpion AT. The E rating means its strength is comparable to a traditional 10 ply tire.
Ah ok. So I looked at the Pirelli tires and it says the following on the sidewall.

Tread: 2 Polyester 2 Steel + 1 Nylon
Sidewall: 2 Polyester
 

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Keep us all in mind and let us now how they do for you both on road and off. Like you, most of my driving will be on paved roads, but I like to do some light to moderate off road driving (maybe 10-15% of the tine). I live up in the Pikes Peak area and the more aggressive tread looks like it will be good in the snow. I'm considering both the Geolander GO15 and the Pirelli. Thanks for sharing your experience with the Pirelli so far.
Will do. I plan on taking it off road on some easy to moderate trails over labor day weekend so I'll let you know how it goes. Let me know what you decide to get for your ride.
 

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Keep us all in mind and let us now how they do for you both on road and off. Like you, most of my driving will be on paved roads, but I like to do some light to moderate off road driving (maybe 10-15% of the tine). I live up in the Pikes Peak area and the more aggressive tread looks like it will be good in the snow. I'm considering both the Geolander GO15 and the Pirelli. Thanks for sharing your experience with the Pirelli so far.
Hey Payton. So over the long Labor Day Weekend I took the TH to a few off road spots and the Pirelli's handled the terrain like a champ. It was mostly sand, gravel & lots of rocks. The TH did really well off road and I have a few battle scars (front end bumper) to show for it. A little more ground clearance would have been nice but since it's my daily driver I'm totally happy with how it performed off road. Did you end up getting tires yet? I'd highly recommend the Pirelli's.
 

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Hey Payton. So over the long Labor Day Weekend I took the TH to a few off road spots and the Pirelli's handled the terrain like a champ. It was mostly sand, gravel & lots of rocks. The TH did really well off road and I have a few battle scars (front end bumper) to show for it. A little more ground clearance would have been nice but since it's my daily driver I'm totally happy with how it performed off road. Did you end up getting tires yet? I'd highly recommend the Pirelli's.
Nice photo! Any more?
 

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It looks like you had a good time. Battle Scars give any Jeep character.
Thank you for the recommendation. I haven't pressed the "Buy" button yet - Frankly, I was waiting to hear from you and a couple of other "test drivers". But with signs of an early fall (and maybe winter) up here in the Pikes Peak area, it is getting to be time...Two more questions 1) Have you had any experience on wet roads yet? and 2) Did you replace the Spare too?
 

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It looks like you had a good time. Battle Scars give any Jeep character.
Thank you for the recommendation. I haven't pressed the "Buy" button yet - Frankly, I was waiting to hear from you and a couple of other "test drivers". But with signs of an early fall (and maybe winter) up here in the Pikes Peak area, it is getting to be time...Two more questions 1) Have you had any experience on wet roads yet? and 2) Did you replace the Spare too?
Hey Payton, not sure why I don't get a notification when there's a reply as I'm following this thread. Anyway, I have not had much experience on wet roads yet as I'm in California and it hasn't rained all summer. I didn't replace the spare. I figure in a pinch, the spare should be sufficient even if it is slightly smaller. Anyway, let me know what you decide to do and share pics. Thanks.
 

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Anyone running the Continental TerrainContact AT? Size is 225/60/17 - very close in all specs (diameter, cross section, revs, etc) to the OEM Falken 215/65/17, so should pose a problem for fitment. Any real world experience?

Had been planning to go with Michelin Defender LTX or Continental CrossContact LX20 (yes, i get these are not AT) in the 225/65/17 size until coming across the Conti AT.
 

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I ordered my Pirelli's over the weekend from Discount Tire. I'm looking forward to getting them on the TH next week and hoping we get enough snow up here in the Pikes Peak area this winter to make good use of them (We really need the moisture). Thanks Neebaum and others for letting us know how they worked on your Renegades.
 

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Anyone running the Continental TerrainContact AT? Size is 225/60/17 - very close in all specs (diameter, cross section, revs, etc) to the OEM Falken 215/65/17, so should pose a problem for fitment. Any real world experience?

Had been planning to go with Michelin Defender LTX or Continental CrossContact LX20 (yes, i get these are not AT) in the 225/65/17 size until coming across the Conti AT.
They may call that an A/T... but that is not an "All Terrain" tread pattern. That's an "All Season" Tread pattern (extremely similar to the Wildpeak H/T's or Goodyear SRA's that comes stock).
Now with CUV's (cross over utility vehicles) dominating auto sales... tire manufacturers are starting to play the "looks like" game. They're starting to take all season tires and just putting some "shoulder" tread on it to make them look more aggressive (and catch they eye), but they are not what they describe. When looking for a real AT tire, look for deep tread, and interlocking cross lugs (not lines down the center of them, which all seasons use to dispel water). I wish they would stop doing this (the marketing game), but it's only going to get worse (as the milder AT tires are selling like hotcakes now).

ETA: not that there's anything wrong with "All Seaons"... I'm strictly talking about some being marketed at "All Terrains" simply because they think they'll sell better (rather than actually MAKING an all terrain tire).
 

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Tires

Looking for AT tires. I am not very educated on what type/size/brand would be best for my 2018 TH. I want the tallest and widest that will still fit on the stock wheels. TIA
 

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Looking for AT tires. I am not very educated on what type/size/brand would be best for my 2018 TH. I want the tallest and widest that will still fit on the stock wheels. TIA
28.5" is MAX (spring perch is the first issue, followed by the wheel well shape).
The only way you'll go past 28.5" is to use spacers (which create another problem with turn arch as it swings wider and hits the wheel well seams) and lift (and a LOT of it. There is zero tire clearance gained from even a 2" lift, since the wheel well isn't shaped to accommodate more than 28.5").
So (with a TH), you can go 28.5" (225/65r17) without a lift (clears).
28.5" WITH a lift (although lift gains you nothing for tire clearance) to make it look "cooler" and give you added ground clearance.
Go 29-29.5" WITH lift, pinch seam mod, and spacers (required to clear the spring perch).

Basically... Jeep designed this vehicle so you CAN'T go big (and that's probably a blessing in disguise, with it's car suspension).
 

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Looking for AT tires. I am not very educated on what type/size/brand would be best for my 2018 TH. I want the tallest and widest that will still fit on the stock wheels. TIA
There is another thread which has two others reporting 235/65r17 are on their TH with no spacers or lift, and they fit. I am also currently waiting on the same size tire to be placed probably this weekend. I can certainly provide an update.
 

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I would imagine this is going to become a bit of an area of contention. 235/65 is at least an inch upgrade. The one's I'm putting on are 29.17". It'll be interesting to see my fit, because I am also increasing the wheel to 17x8.5, and it'll be moving close to an inch toward the back, and poke out a full inch. We'll see what happens.

From CarsonB::
"Update on if the 235/65/17 tires fit.

I got them installed this week, specifically the Hankook Dynapro RF10 and no rubbing issues so far. In terms of Fuel economy, I have noticed the MPG is worse during accelerating but once you get up to speed its barely worse than stock. Road noise is the same as stock. It's pretty close to the strut perch so my only concern is it will catch a little if snow/ice gets on the tires but other than that it should be fine. The key issue I have noticed from so many people complaining that their tires wont fit is because they are all running spacers. I don't think that many people realize that spacers actually make your cars tire sweep out a larger arc therefore causing it to hit the fender well. It makes it look cool but I don't want to chop up my car for 1" extra of poking out, not to mention I would think that the tires would make the car less aerodynamic because the wheels stick out past flush with the side of the car therefore causing significant MPG drops.

My setup is stock wheels on a non lifted trailhawk. I can post pictures later if people are interested."

There is another a couple pages later, who cut out the inside of the Fenders, but he used 30mm spacers. He also didn't necessarily say he needed to do it.

https://www.jeeprenegadeforum.com/forum/353-trailhawk/12058-wheels-tire-specs-18.html
 

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I would imagine this is going to become a bit of an area of contention. 235/65 is at least an inch upgrade. The one's I'm putting on are 29.17". It'll be interesting to see my fit, because I am also increasing the wheel to 17x8.5, and it'll be moving close to an inch toward the back, and poke out a full inch. We'll see what happens.

From CarsonB::
"Update on if the 235/65/17 tires fit.

I got them installed this week, specifically the Hankook Dynapro RF10 and no rubbing issues so far. In terms of Fuel economy, I have noticed the MPG is worse during accelerating but once you get up to speed its barely worse than stock. Road noise is the same as stock. It's pretty close to the strut perch so my only concern is it will catch a little if snow/ice gets on the tires but other than that it should be fine. The key issue I have noticed from so many people complaining that their tires wont fit is because they are all running spacers. I don't think that many people realize that spacers actually make your cars tire sweep out a larger arc therefore causing it to hit the fender well. It makes it look cool but I don't want to chop up my car for 1" extra of poking out, not to mention I would think that the tires would make the car less aerodynamic because the wheels stick out past flush with the side of the car therefore causing significant MPG drops.

My setup is stock wheels on a non lifted trailhawk. I can post pictures later if people are interested."

There is another a couple pages later, who cut out the inside of the Fenders, but he used 30mm spacers. He also didn't necessarily say he needed to do it.

https://www.jeeprenegadeforum.com/forum/353-trailhawk/12058-wheels-tire-specs-18.html
Thank you for posting this!
I haven talked about wheel spacers quite a few times on here, and will do so again.
Wheel spacers are NOT a good idea.
Using wheel spacers means you are taking something that used to use steel on steel (with a thin layer of aluminum in between) being steel lugs to steel hub, sandwiching an aluminum wheel hub. If using spacers, you are then bolting a soft aluminum "donut" to a steel hub (weak point)… then bolting a steel wheel (separately) to that soft aluminum donut (yet another weak point)… and expecting it to hold up like steel on steel would??
Add to that... you've now added wheel arc (tires have to swing out side to side AS WELL AS front to back, just to do the same action as a stock set up's "pivot").
Add to that... That arc (since it makes your tires move FORWARD/BACKWARD more) will now contact your tires with the wheel well (creating yet another problem, on top of all the others).
Add to that... those wheel spacers now add that much more leverage on your wheel bearings/suspension that was NOT there before.

Is THAT worth the "cool" look of pushing your tires out 1-2"? NO.
Now people will jump on here and say "yeah, well they've been using wheel spacers forever and many have been just fine!". Yep... and many have NOT (google reports of wheel spacer issues).
Wheel spacers are NEVER acceptable. NEVER. If anything, use more wheel offset wheels. That will eliminate the "spacer" issues, but will still leave you with the arc issues (wheel well contact, front/back sweep, bearing load, suspension load), but at least your wheel won't fall off, and kill you, as you're going down the highway at 75.
I started off roading 27 years ago. I have NEVER, and will NEVER use wheel spacers and cannot stress enough how bad of an idea they are.
Sorry for the rant... but had to get that off my chest :)
 

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Sometimes I think 2" wheel spacers would be a good idea, because then I can straddle the huge speed bumps that have appeared everywhere in the UK. (Pillow shaped mounds of tarmac and concrete for those unfamiliar.) Of course the car would not be any good for anything other than straight line driving over speed bumps, but it solves that problem.

Any vehicle is designed for its task, and when you choose a particular one you accept the compromises that entails. If I wanted a better off-roader, I'd buy something different. If I wanted a sleeker road cruiser, I'd have bought one. If I wanted a bus I'd buy a bus.
 

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I know and have met dozens of Jeep owners who ride trails in Colorado and Utah that would put the trails most of us have been on to shame who have used spacers for years on all sorts of Jeep builds, including one Renegade I got to see. The negatives to spacers are generally relegated to the cheap spacers. I lived in W Colorado for a few years, and never met a Jeep builder who outrightly spoke against spacers.

That said, I can confirm that 235/65r17s fit a Renegade Trailhawk (I just had them installed).

As an aside, I chose to install 25mm spacers because, well, Renegades have a shitty 5x110, and it's almost impossible to get aggressive wheels with decent offset.
 

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I know and have met dozens of Jeep owners who ride trails in Colorado and Utah that would put the trails most of us have been on to shame who have used spacers for years on all sorts of Jeep builds, including one Renegade I got to see. The negatives to spacers are generally relegated to the cheap spacers. I lived in W Colorado for a few years, and never met a Jeep builder who outrightly spoke against spacers.

That said, I can confirm that 235/65r17s fit a Renegade Trailhawk (I just had them installed).

As an aside, I chose to install 25mm spacers because, well, Renegades have a shitty 5x110, and it's almost impossible to get aggressive wheels with decent offset.
I'm not familiar with any serious off road rigs running spacers. They will even spend thousands for wider axles/housing just to avoid using them. Most just opt for different backspacing wheels (but that doesn't solve the wheel arc issue, so not ideal).
Many of these supposed "off roaders" that do use spacers, you'll see many youtubes of wheels coming off on the trails (yep... those wonderful spacers! haha). Cheap or not... they are a weak link where there shouldn't be one. Anytime you have to bolt something to then bolt something to that (when it's avoidable) is a recipe for disaster (and silly when you think about it. Just use offset wheels).
They ARE, however, popular with the "I want the look, and occasionally might do SOME rocks with it" crowd. They're just getting lucky and rolling the dice, IMHO.
I stand by my statement, and if you research hard core off roading, you'll find none of them use them either (for said reasons).
I also view it as even WORSE when it's the "kind of" off roader, because they are using it on the street most of the time (about the worst place, and speeds, you'd want to have a wheel fly off).
But I'll just end my warning against using them with "to each their own. Everyone needs to make their own choices based on their needs". :)
 
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