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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a new Renegade owner. I've had it less that 2 weeks. It's a Latitude with the 2.4L engine and 9 speed automatic. One thing I've noticed is my transmission temperature seems high. After about 20 minutes of driving, the gauge needle is pointing well past the halfway mark and almost to the 3/4 mark. The transmission temperature is usually about 170 degrees but I've seen it as high as 181. Is anybody else getting this? Should I have my dealer look at it?
 

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I don't look at mine daily, but I have been observing it daily recently. The highest I recall seeing is 165*. I don't think it's a problem unless it's over 200-210*.

Clifton
 

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I have the same Latitude 2.4L with the 9 Speed. Took a 7 hour trip a few weeks ago, my transmission temperature never went over 160-170.

But I live in Florida, where its very flat. I'm sure this may come into play.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses. What concerns me is that I always understood gauges to be calibrated so that "normal" is in the middle. That's how my coolant temperature seems to work and every other vehicle I've owned, the temperature gauges always went to the middle after 10-15 minutes of driving.


This is the first vehicle I've owned that has a transmission temperature gauge.
 

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Thanks for the responses. What concerns me is that I always understood gauges to be calibrated so that "normal" is in the middle. That's how my coolant temperature seems to work and every other vehicle I've owned, the temperature gauges always went to the middle after 10-15 minutes of driving.


This is the first vehicle I've owned that has a transmission temperature gauge.
Most modern gauges show a "normal range" that doesn't actually correspond to a particular temperature. Only if the temperature exceeds the normal range, the needle will wander higher, or lower. Once the temperature/pressure etc goes critical, the idiot light and maybe a buzzer will come on.

The reason for this type implementation is that most people would freak out if gauges were to constantly display accurate, but varying values. That's why modern gauges are almost as useless as idiot lights, and why gauges are increasingly disappearing and being replaced with idiot lights (See Mazda 3 for a good laugh).

So, do yourself a favor and consider the 12 o-clock needle position an indication that the temperature (or other parameter) is within normal operating range. To find out what the actual value is, you will need to plug in an OBD2 reader, which will display a numerical value.

Gauges, both analog and digital,l also use dampening and dithering to show relatively stable values, so as to not worry the ignorant operator.



An example:

1. Car with accurate, not-dumbed down display:

Engine and coolant cold: needle all the way left
Engine and coolant getting warmer: needle climbs slowly
Thermostat opens: needle climbs momentarily faster
Engine/coolant reach operating temperature: needle stays in a certain range
Engine/coolant gets too hot: needle moves right and towards the overheating indicator


2. Car with dumbed-down display:

Engine and coolant cold: blue idiot light on
Engine and coolant getting warmer: blue idiot light on
Thermostat opens: not indicated (you pray your thermostat works; no way to know without touching radiator hoses)
Engine/coolant reach operating temperature: blue idiot light off
Engine/coolant gets too hot: orange idiot light comes on
 
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