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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any idea on the quality of steel and/or rust prevention these Renegades will have?

I know these bodies are going all over the world into different environments but will they rust out quickly? What grade of steel is used? Does Italy use the highest level of metal prep or the worst? In general, does high-strength steel rust quickly? Etc.....

PS: Later I did find this in partial answer at least on the high-strength steel door pillars, sills, rear crash box:

They are used in cars, trucks, cranes, bridges, roller coasters and other structures that are designed to handle large amounts of stress or need a good strength-to-weight ratio.[2] HSLA steel cross-sections and structures are usually 20 to 30% lighter than a carbon steel with the same strength.

HSLA steels are also more resistant to rust than most carbon steels because of their lack of pearlite – the fine layers of ferrite (almost pure iron) and cementite in pearlite. HSLA steels usually have densities of around 7800 kg/m³.
 

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Any idea on the quality of steel and/or rust prevention these Renegades will have?

I know these bodies are going all over the world into different environments but will they rust out quickly? What grade of steel is used? Does Italy use the highest level of metal prep or the worst? In general, does high-strength steel rust quickly? Etc.....

PS: Later I did find this in partial answer at least on the high-strength steel door pillars, sills, rear crash box:

They are used in cars, trucks, cranes, bridges, roller coasters and other structures that are designed to handle large amounts of stress or need a good strength-to-weight ratio.[2] HSLA steel cross-sections and structures are usually 20 to 30% lighter than a carbon steel with the same strength.

HSLA steels are also more resistant to rust than most carbon steels because of their lack of pearlite – the fine layers of ferrite (almost pure iron) and cementite in pearlite. HSLA steels usually have densities of around 7800 kg/m³.

It would strike me as extremely odd to not jsut dip the whole car. Most cars use that at this point. It's so much not an issue in general that even consumer reports ditched the issue of body rust on their questionnaire something like 2001-2002. Some of the New england and harsher climate contingent can chime in, but in NJ, where all cars were rust colored eventually, I haven't seen serious body rust on anything less than maybe 15-20 years old. Msot that I have seen rusting at even that age are abused pickups where any surface coating type protection wasn't likely to still be intact 100% based on the body condition. Heck even the nearby bone yard that parts vehicles out rather than scraps everything is mostly not rusty looking these days.
 

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I agree that this is mostly a non-issue now. They have definitely protected the Renegade from rust, and if there were any problems, we'd have to wait until the Renegade has been around for a while before we see how it holds up.
 

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@JFS

How do you personally combat rust on your vehicles now? I live in New England and the winters are bad. They use a LOT of salt on the roads up here. I try to get into an automatic car wash once or twice a month from December to March and get the undercarriage washed.

I have heard some folks on the forum say that they oil or grease many of the components of their car to help avoid rust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The salt in NE Ohio will literally come off in flakes off the paint after a few days of a snowstorm. The largest salt mines in the world are under Lake Erie near where I live.

I just oil spray (flood) the underside, and inside panels twice a year. Underside nuts and bolts (everything ) looks new after 10 years on all my cars. Makes maintenance alot nicer.

Of course the average Jeep owner is soooo rich they just trade thisr in every 3 years and never worry about issues like corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
If you don't take these precautions, will you actually encounter rust or is this more of a prevention of the worst case scenario type thing.
Oil places a corrosion-proof barrier between the salt and the metal. But it still has to be replaced. The galvanized and dipped corrosion protection is still another layer of metal that corrodes at a slower pace, but still corrodes.

I build and restore cars. I'll drive a thousand miles to get out of NE USA due to salt corrosion.

Insofar as my own cars, I take a parachute approach to most everything including rust. In that by the time you find out you have a problem, it too late.

So its all about prevention and planning. So I find taking a half-hour twice a year and have and old guy in coveralls and a lift spray the car's fenders, doors, and underside thoroughly with oil the best way to keep it all like new.
 

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Oil places a corrosion-proof barrier between the salt and the metal. But it still has to be replaced. The galvanized and dipped corrosion protection is still another layer of metal that corrodes at a slower pace, but still corrodes.

I build and restore cars. I'll drive a thousand miles to get out of NE USA due to salt corrosion.

Insofar as my own cars, I take a parachute approach to most everything including rust. In that by the time you find out you have a problem, it too late.

So its all about prevention and planning. So I find taking a half-hour twice a year and have and old guy in coveralls and a lift spray the car's fenders, doors, and underside thoroughly with oil the best way to keep it all like new.
I know that it is a problem with older cars. I just didn't think to worry about it that much with new vehicles. Like you said though. There isn't a problem until there is one and then its kinda too late.
 

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I know that it is a problem with older cars. I just didn't think to worry about it that much with new vehicles. Like you said though. There isn't a problem until there is one and then its kinda too late.
By definition, restoration is dealing with older cars.

These days, it should be no worse than the industry overall, and the alloys fo the high strength steels they use more of in the renegade should fare a bit better than weaker alloys.

So the answer is probably safely, no worse than any other car you purchased in the last 10-15 years.
 

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Sorry about the thread revival, but as I'm soon getting a renegade and i have no plans of sparing it from the harsh Swedish winter, including the ungodly amount of road salt our moron of a government approves for use every year. I reckon I will be the first to report how much of it is left of it after one swedish winter (which equals to about ten in other countries).
 

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By definition, restoration is dealing with older cars.

These days, it should be no worse than the industry overall, and the alloys fo the high strength steels they use more of in the renegade should fare a bit better than weaker alloys.

So the answer is probably safely, no worse than any other car you purchased in the last 10-15 years.
Unless the chassis plugs are missing?
 

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Has anyone ever gotten hold of a diagram showing which chassis plugs should be installed? I wonder whether the service and / or parts manual for the Renegade would show them? I'm tempted to make the dealer put it up on a hoist so I can inspect the underside before I accept delivery.

Tim
 

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Has anyone ever gotten hold of a diagram showing which chassis plugs should be installed? I wonder whether the service and / or parts manual for the Renegade would show them? I'm tempted to make the dealer put it up on a hoist so I can inspect the underside before I accept delivery.

Tim


Almost exactly my thoughts.
 

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Swedish car magazine Vi bilägare issue # 10 2015 had a review of the Jeep Renegade. When they review a car, they also take the car to a company which is in the rust prevention business. This company assess the rust prevention measures used on the car. I am sorry to report that the magazine gave the Renegade only one point out of a possible five points for rust protection.

According to the magazine, the undercarriage is only partially covered with an anti-rust agent. Furthermore, the Renegade has not been treated with an anti-rust agent inside beams and in cavities in the undercarriage. The same goes for inside the doors and the rear hatch. They also wrote that the welded seams on the Renegade’s doors and rear hatch had not been sealed with a protective cord. They included a picture of the unprotected welded seams (see attachment) and said that they hadn’t seen an unprotected seam like this since the 80ies.

They did find a few positive things too: The hood is made of aluminum. The inner fenders are made of plastic. The inner fender in the rear has a good design. The fuel tank and filler tube are also made of plastic. But all in all, the Renegade failed the test.

After reading this test, I inspected the welded seams on the doors and rear the hatch on my own Renegade and they are covered with a protective cord! Could it be that the Renegade has different rust protection for different markets?
 

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The salt in NE Ohio will literally come off in flakes off the paint after a few days of a snowstorm. The largest salt mines in the world are under Lake Erie near where I live. .
I definitely don't miss the salty roads in Ohio!! (Grew up in the Cleveland area). I'm relieved that living in AZ I don't have to worry about the rust protection so much. But, very disappointing if the Rene is not being protected properly....
 

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After reading this test, I inspected the welded seams on the doors and rear the hatch on my own Renegade and they are covered with a protective cord! Could it be that the Renegade has different rust protection for different markets?
When was that test? I wonder if it was unofficial and they were actually reviewing one of the prototypes/pre-production models. They stayed on the press circuit a very long time.
 

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It's in the latest issue and the test must have been done very recently. Probably in May or June. I did however recognize the car from another test in another Swedish magazine from early February (same license plate number). In that test they complained about the clear coat coming off the rear hatch when they removed their test decal. So it may very well have been a special press car without the proper "fine tuning" of paint and rust protection.

It would however be interesting to hear from other owners if their cars have the welded seams sealed with a protective cord? And also if anybody has checked if their car has been treated with an anti rust agent inside the doors and hatch?
 

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The holes that are under discussion are not intended to be plugged, they are used during the assembly process of the Renegade and are completely sealed off from the interior of the vehicle. The Renegade in production today fully meets all the corrosion requirements for Jeep. We are working to understand and improve the process for future actions.
 

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The holes that are under discussion are not intended to be plugged, they are used during the assembly process of the Renegade and are completely sealed off from the interior of the vehicle. The Renegade in production today fully meets all the corrosion requirements for Jeep.
I don't much like the sound of that. Holes in the chassis are OK
If it is all good then why this "We are working to understand and improve the process for future actions."
 
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