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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have added a tool to my tool kit in the jeep, and thought I would share. :)

You can purchase a 12mm x 1.25 wheel stud pilot pin for around $ 25.00 - $27.00 which you get 2 wheel studs pins.(see picture)

OR you can get creative and purchase 2 - 12mm x 1.25 - 4" long studs at your favorite
hardware store for around 4 bucks each.

I purchased some at Lowes the other day and took a hacksaw to cut the heads off . I ground the end so there were no sharp edges.
They don't have the fancy knurl grip on the end, but you are only finger tightening them, just to hold the wheel in place.

This will also work for the Dart and Fiat 500
 

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The trick I was always used to was holding the wheel with one hand and threadding it in a few turns at the lowest point to hold the wheel,.
Since I usually only jack a few inches to change my tires, I use my toe to hold the bottom of the tire/wheel to the hub. If you hold the bottom secure the wheel's off balance center of mass will keep the top on the hub. This works equally well with studs.
 

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The trick I was always used to was holding the wheel with one hand and threadding it in a few turns at the lowest point to hold the wheel,.
Over time I became an expert at wheel and wheel bolt juggling. At some point I didn't use the guide pin any longer and popped a wheel bolt in right away.
 

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I too purchased a pair of the stud tools and keep them in the back with the jack. If I ever have to change a tire in the dark while it's raining, I want the job to be as easy as possible.
 

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so... what do these do?
Confused as well. Don't think I've ever heard of or seen a vehicle without studs?


Edit: Ok, just looked up some info on lug bolts and such. Don't think I've ever tried changing a tire with lug bolts. These might really come in handy!
 
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so... what do these do?
Most other cars have wheel studs inserted into the hub facing outward. You "hang" the wheel on the studs and screw on the lug nuts to secure the wheel.

The Renegade (and maybe other cars these days) do not have wheel studs. There are threaded holes in the hubs. You must line up the wheel with the hub and screw in a lug bolt into the threaded hole. This can be awkward unless you have the tire/wheel supported (by the ground, your foot, or a helper).

The pilot pins screw into the threaded holes (two make it easy, but one is enough). Then just hang the wheel on the pins which line up the holes perfectly. Screw in three lug bolts finger tight, remove the pins, and then screw in the other two lug bolts. Now tighten as usual.

Certainly you don't need these pins, but it sure makes the job easier in a cramped space or in the dark.
 
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Confused as well. Don't think I've ever heard of or seen a vehicle without studs?


Edit: Ok, just looked up some info on lug bolts and such. Don't think I've ever tried changing a tire with lug bolts. These might really come in handy!

Almost all European cars use wheel bolts instead of wheel studs and lug nuts. Before I moved to the US, I only ever saw wheel bolts on cars and wheel studs and lug nuts only on heavy trucks and construction equipment.

I have often heard of wheels studs breaking, but have never heard of a wheel bolt braking, However, careless installers have wrecked a few of y wheel bolts with impact wrenches over the years (distorted bolt head).

I prefer by far wheel bolts, because that's what I grew up with and because that's what I'm used to. Wheels studs and lug nuts are more convenient, but a wheel bolt is safer. With wheel bolts, you have one failure point, which is each bolt. The thread in the hub can't really fail. With wheel studs and lug nuts you have studs and nuts, both of which may fail.
 

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@lamont


Thanks. I know it's all about what you are used to. I have not ever heard of studs or nuts failing, and I'm not saying it cant' happen, just that it's not common. I don't see how a nut would fail any more than threads in the hub failing, so I only really see one failure point on either.


I did a little more research and most agree that cross threading is the biggest concern to damage either a stud or nut and in that case, replacing a stud is much easier than replacing the whole hub because of a cross thread. But that was just my limited research in lug studs vs lug bolts.
 

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Wheel studs are actually cheaper and easier to repair than wheel bolts. And studs are preferred in any circumstance for superior clamping force and strength. I have never seen a stud fail except from some idiot torquing it with an impact before threading it on properly.
 

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Wheel studs are actually cheaper and easier to repair than wheel bolts.
Who repairs wheel bolts? You just replace them.


And studs are preferred in any circumstance for superior clamping force and strength.
Actually, the advantage of a stud and nut over a bolt is that the nut torque provides the clamping force rather than the torque of the fastener itself. Also, the rotational force is avoided. Since the stud does not rotate during torquing it stretches without twisting. So the torque load is more evenly distributed. That's however more important in engine assembly (head bolts versus head studs) rather than when it comes to wheels.

I have never seen a stud fail except from some idiot torquing it with an impact before threading it on properly.
And I have seen stud failure, but never had a problem with wheel bolts, other than someone damaging a wheels bolt head with an improperly used impact wrench. Replacing seized wheel studs and drilling out (or using an EZ Out extractor) broken studs is no picnic.
 

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Getting wheel studs out are a piece of cake and you don't drill them out or use an ez-out, you press them out.
Bolts are horrible cause then you do have to use an ez-out to get the broke bolt out and then drill and install helicoils or such or throw the damaged hub away.
I do this kind of crap for a living and have for 35 years. Not to mention having to use a stud tool to support or align the wheel till you get a bolt or 2 in.
 

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Getting wheel studs out are a piece of cake and you don't drill them out or use an ez-out, you press them out.
Bolts are horrible cause then you do have to use an ez-out to get the broke bolt out and then drill and install helicoils or such or throw the damaged hub away.
I do this kind of crap for a living and have for 35 years. Not to mention having to use a stud tool to support or align the wheel till you get a bolt or 2 in.
Obviously I was talking about threaded wheel studs, nor press-in studs. Did you think I'd drill out a press-in stud? Or are you per chance hammering out threaded studs? I've seen it all. Who knows? :confused:

Sorry to hear you are surrounded by bad mechanics who have managed to break off wheel bolts left and right for the past 35 years. I guess that those who manage that will even more easily destroy and strip wheel studs and nuts, though. Where there's a will, there's a way.

And nobody with a little bit practice in changing wheels requires a wheel stud tool to get a wheel bolt in, unless he's hopelessly clumsy or has lost 9 out ten fingers thanks to bad aim when hammering. :laugh:
 

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. . . And nobody with a little bit practice in changing wheels requires a wheel stud tool to get a wheel bolt in, unless he's hopelessly clumsy or has lost 9 out ten fingers thanks to bad aim when hammering. :laugh:
Actually, I took off a wheel in my garage when I first got my Trailhawk just to try it and see how the jack works (so I can change a tire in the dark while it's raining without fumbling). I always do this whenever I get a new car.

I thought it was a royal pain to hold up the wheel while screwing in the first two wheel bolts. Maybe I'm just used to fixed lugs on each hub, but I can't imagine trying this on a dark road in the snow/rain. I ponied up for a pair of wheel studs to make my life easier. They don't cost much and it sure does makes the job easier.
 
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Actually, I took off a wheel in my garage when I first got my Trailhawk just to try it and see how the jack works (so I can change a tire in the dark while it's raining without fumbling). I always do this whenever I get a new car.

I thought it was a royal pain to hold up the wheel while screwing in the first two wheel bolts. Maybe I'm just used to fixed lugs on each hub, but I can't imagine trying this on a dark road in the snow/rain. I ponied up for a pair of wheel studs to make my life easier. They don't cost much and it sure does makes the job easier.
Put your foot under the wheel to support it.
 

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Thinks its bad in a driveway or garage, try doing it on a trail. Wheelbolts have always been a bad European design.
You go tell 'em. And if you can't live with the superior wheel bolts and have an unquenchable hankering for downgrading, for whatever preposterous reason, you can always install studs into the hub and fiddle with nuts.
 
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