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Interesting article. In a way I see folks buying it if they were to make one, but it will surely give those Wrangler "anything other than a Wrangler is not a Jeep" owners a heart attack. lol

What's your take on such thing?

TS
 

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If it had AWD and a range of at least 250 miles I would be all over it. Better yet a 53 mile range and then a gas engine to kick in (like the new Volt). The best thing is that the 9 speed transmission would be gone.
 

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If it had AWD and a range of at least 250 miles I would be all over it. Better yet a 53 mile range and then a gas engine to kick in (like the new Volt). The best thing is that the 9 speed transmission would be gone.
I just can't picture an electric car would have the toque needed to be a JEEP. I' not one of those dudes that needs every Jeep to be a Wrangler, but Jeeps need to have certain attributes.
 

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I don't think I'd buy one.

I don't have a need to try and squeeze mpgs out of my Renegade. If I did I probably wouldn't have traded my last car for one. I also wonder about long term costs and maintenance in an electric/hybrid vehicle. You don't see a lot of older electric/hybrids out on the roads even though they have been around for 15-20 years (Prius, Insight)

Now, if you asked about a turbo diesel, I would definitely be interested in one of those (US)
 

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Series hybrid with a very efficient diesel engine would probably be the right way to go for a jeep.

Personally, I think a lot of very cool things could be done with electric, but nobody is really doing them. Tesla has primarily made a toaster with a giant tablet and an incredible zero to 60 time. Which is a heck of a lot more than others did, but if you look at some of the custom EVE retrofitters out there, they've done so much more interesting.

A small 4x4 might be a really good platform to push the limit on packaging options for an EV or series hybrid.

That being said, outside of nissan, nobody is really pricing the things at the entry level. They are premium vehicles with scaled back feature sets. Jeep never said word one about a renegade EV, that's all careful writing around the facts that the article's author did. Jeep said we got younger, and we want more younger, and also that we will have to do EVs sooner rather than later.
 

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Nope.
@raz-0 makes a good point. Turbo diesel hybrid would be the way to go. I'm surprised VW doesn't have anything on the market with that sort of technology.
 
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I'd absolutely buy an electric Renegade. My previous vehicle was a Volt and I loved it (had a JK before that). We sold because we moved to a community where the insurance wouldn't allow us to install a charger below a certain height (we're on the coast of SC). Range extended electric like the Volt is the way to go i think, especially if you plan on going on any adventures.

FYI: Volt has 273 ft. lbs of torque as soon as you touch the pedal. If you havent driven an electric before, I highly recommend trying it out. Put it in sport mode, turn off the traction control, and hammer down.
 

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VW have made a big mess with their diesel engined models cheating exhaust emissions in the UK, so can't see them doing owt until they sort that fiasco.
 

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Nope.
@raz-0 makes a good point. Turbo diesel hybrid would be the way to go. I'm surprised VW doesn't have anything on the market with that sort of technology.
I could be wrong on the diesel thing. It may not be the most efficient. VW/AUDI made a decision that they needed access to very small, very high output engines and bought up ducati to provide such. I don't know if that is dodging the hybrid question or doubling down on it.

As for FCA, chrysler has some turbine engine in cars IP under their belt, a series hybrid with an appropriately designed turbine powering it would be very efficient. If done right it could also eat a wide range of fuels. Dunno about emission though, but it could be very jeepy having a turbine that will eat whatever is cheapest charing your battery/motor circuit with inboard per hub motors. If you did it right, the thing could ford above the wheel hubs by a good bit before it stopped looking like a conventional vehicle to accommodate more. You could have several hundred foot pounds available at 0 rpm.
 

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Land Rover's all electric Defender had 94hp and 243 ftlb torque. It could pull 12 tons up a 6% incline. Range of batteries was only 50 miles plus 12.5 miles reserve. With the hill descent and regenerative braking it could regenerate 80% of the batteries charge. Downhill it made 30kw of power. It could wade deeper than it's engined siblings. This was in 2013. Have heard nowt about it since.............
 

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I would not buy an electric 4x4 simply because with a fossil-fuel-powered 4x4 I can pour more fuel in from an external fuel canister to extend the range, or if I run out of fuel away from civilization I can possibly have someone else bring fuel to where I am such that I can get the vehicle moving again.

For a road-going vehicle, especially a city-use road-going vehicle I agree that electric is the way to go in the future. The maintenance is easier and usually less messy (ie, very few fluids, a lot of electric-driven accessories rather than belt/pump accessories, accessories are no longer mounted to the prime mover as cabling allows them to be positioned wherever on the vehicle), and the ubiquity of the electric grid means that one doesn't have to use service stations anymore.

I predict that the car wash will replace the gas station for electrics, and that car washes will expand their services to topping-up consumable fluids (mostly windshield washer fluids), doing light chassis lubrication (ball joints, possibly electric motor or drivetrain bearings), and tire inflation and rotation, as the customer's car is cleaned or detailed at the carwash.
 

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I don't think I'd buy one.

I don't have a need to try and squeeze mpgs out of my Renegade. If I did I probably wouldn't have traded my last car for one. I also wonder about long term costs and maintenance in an electric/hybrid vehicle. You don't see a lot of older electric/hybrids out on the roads even though they have been around for 15-20 years (Prius, Insight)
(US)
Prius's (Prii?) last just fine. Sold wife's 2003 (1st gen) Prius at 120,000 miles with no issues. Currently have a 2009 Prius and a 2014 Prius V. Toyota's drivetrain/charging system warranty is 8 years or 100K miles.

Per Toyota's own testing, they go up to 180K miles before any of the cells start to deteriorate. (Many have complained that the whole battery pack, if replaced, would cost a fortune, however the pack will not fail as a whole, the individual 6V cell packs in the whole pack will fail individually, but not take down the whole power system.)

In the documentary "Who Killed The Electric Car", a mechanic shows the entirety of mechanical parts in an EV1, only about a hundred, versus about 8 times that of an internal combustion engine. So there's a "conspiracy theory" type of theme that suggests if an automaker went all electric, the dealer structure would collapse as much of a dealer's profit is service.

The Insight really didn't sell because it was less practical (same with the CRZ hybrid) being a two-seater. There are still several 1st gen Prius's (Prii?) hanging around Ann Arbor here.

Torque? This might answer a lot: http://cleantechnica.com/2013/09/16...ng-speeds-the-best-thing-about-electric-cars/

The only real major drawback is the battery range/charging/weight. Otherwise a 4WD/AWD electric car could climb trees.
 

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I would not buy an electric 4x4 simply because with a fossil-fuel-powered 4x4 I can pour more fuel in from an external fuel canister to extend the range, or if I run out of fuel away from civilization I can possibly have someone else bring fuel to where I am such that I can get the vehicle moving again.
Or just start venturing outside of traditional vehicle packaging, and provide a means of docking a small genset for when you go offroad. There's a bunch of ways to approach that problem.
 
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